Restoring Cars TME

Want a car but I want something a bit more unique.

Also going back to college as a mechanic so it's something to practice on. I'm in the UK. Anyone got advice on where to buy a restoration project car? Also what common faults do you find with older cars?

1.  come up with your budget or estimate and plan on spending 4 times as much.

Not sure where to tell you to look in the UK, in the US you can look on craigslist, ebay motors, etc.  As far as common faults, in parts of the US where they salt the roads in winter, you'll expect to see more rust.  Various cars have issues that are unique to their specific models.  Old trucks usually need cab mounts, cab floors, and bed floors.  Sometimes an engine will be seized up if it's been sitting for a long time.  Inline 6 cylinder engines are easy to work on and would be a good project to learn.

Rust is the #1 problem. Try to avoid. Most mechinacials are much simpler in older cars.

I'm starting to think restoring is the way to go.I mean fuk a new one ton diesel is 100 grand here in Canada.Can restore something for less than that and it will hold its value better.

64FordF100 -


1.  come up with your budget or estimate and plan on spending 4 times as much.



Not sure where to tell you to look in the UK, in the US you can look on craigslist, ebay motors, etc.  As far as common faults, in parts of the US where they salt the roads in winter, you'll expect to see more rust.  Various cars have issues that are unique to their specific models.  Old trucks usually need cab mounts, cab floors, and bed floors.  Sometimes an engine will be seized up if it's been sitting for a long time.  Inline 6 cylinder engines are easy to work on and would be a good project to learn.

That's some excellent tips man. Inline 6 is what I'll keep a look out for.

Chadderz - 
64FordF100 -

1.  come up with your budget or estimate and plan on spending 4 times as much.

Not sure where to tell you to look in the UK, in the US you can look on craigslist, ebay motors, etc.  As far as common faults, in parts of the US where they salt the roads in winter, you'll expect to see more rust.  Various cars have issues that are unique to their specific models.  Old trucks usually need cab mounts, cab floors, and bed floors.  Sometimes an engine will be seized up if it's been sitting for a long time.  Inline 6 cylinder engines are easy to work on and would be a good project to learn.

<span class="User-293991" id="userPost62055157">That's some excellent tips man. Inline 6 is what I'll keep a look out for.</span></blockquote>

 

Do you have anything in mind that you might be interested in?  Like do you want American, British, etc?  Don't pick something too obscure that you can't find parts.  I bet you would have good luck with an MG Midget if the parts aren't too high, they had an inline 4 cylinder and they made them for a lot of years.  Also pretty much every popular classic car has an internet forum dedicated to them where you can get info from other people who have the same car.  Those are usually really helpful and friendly places.  Anything old, you will want to go completely through the suspension and brake system, change all fluids etc before taking it on the road if it's driveable.  Also, find and purchase the shop manual for whatever you end up getting.

 

64FordF100 -
Chadderz - 
64FordF100 -

1.  come up with your budget or estimate and plan on spending 4 times as much.

Not sure where to tell you to look in the UK, in the US you can look on craigslist, ebay motors, etc.  As far as common faults, in parts of the US where they salt the roads in winter, you'll expect to see more rust.  Various cars have issues that are unique to their specific models.  Old trucks usually need cab mounts, cab floors, and bed floors.  Sometimes an engine will be seized up if it's been sitting for a long time.  Inline 6 cylinder engines are easy to work on and would be a good project to learn.

<span class="User-293991" id="userPost62055157">That's some excellent tips man. Inline 6 is what I'll keep a look out for.</span></blockquote>

 

Do you have anything in mind that you might be interested in?  Like do you want American, British, etc?  Don't pick something too obscure that you can't find parts.  I bet you would have good luck with an MG Midget if the parts aren't too high, they had an inline 4 cylinder and they made them for a lot of years.  Also pretty much every popular classic car has an internet forum dedicated to them where you can get info from other people who have the same car.  Those are usually really helpful and friendly places.  Anything old, you will want to go completely through the suspension and brake system, change all fluids etc before taking it on the road if it's driveable.  Also, find and purchase the shop manual for whatever you end up getting.


 

Nah, literally anything. I mean, it would be awesome to find an old beetle or mini but really anything. I'll start scouring forums though, that's excellent advice!

If you’re considering old British cars you can plan to rewire the entire vehicle.  Brits cannot engineer or install automotive electrical systems for some reason.

Chadderz - 
64FordF100 -
Chadderz - 
64FordF100 -

1.  come up with your budget or estimate and plan on spending 4 times as much.

Not sure where to tell you to look in the UK, in the US you can look on craigslist, ebay motors, etc.  As far as common faults, in parts of the US where they salt the roads in winter, you'll expect to see more rust.  Various cars have issues that are unique to their specific models.  Old trucks usually need cab mounts, cab floors, and bed floors.  Sometimes an engine will be seized up if it's been sitting for a long time.  Inline 6 cylinder engines are easy to work on and would be a good project to learn.

<span class="User-293991" id="userPost62055157">That's some excellent tips man. Inline 6 is what I'll keep a look out for.</span></blockquote>

 

Do you have anything in mind that you might be interested in?  Like do you want American, British, etc?  Don't pick something too obscure that you can't find parts.  I bet you would have good luck with an MG Midget if the parts aren't too high, they had an inline 4 cylinder and they made them for a lot of years.  Also pretty much every popular classic car has an internet forum dedicated to them where you can get info from other people who have the same car.  Those are usually really helpful and friendly places.  Anything old, you will want to go completely through the suspension and brake system, change all fluids etc before taking it on the road if it's driveable.  Also, find and purchase the shop manual for whatever you end up getting.

 

Nah, literally anything. I mean, it would be awesome to find an old beetle or mini but really anything. I'll start scouring forums though, that's excellent advice!

I think either of those should have parts available.  I'd say to get one with as solid of a body as you can, mechanical work is a lot easier than bodywork.

Include the car into your monthly budget or you'll never finish it.

Most people do not grasp the meaning of the word "restore."  

 

It is a literal word, and to "restore" a car you are restoring it to the condition in which it left the factory.  No modern touches, no safety or performance improvements, no personalization.  If it came with shitty bias-ply whitewall tires, then it must have the same shitty tires to be truly "restored."  Old crappy batteries, old crappy radios and speakers, spark plug wires/hoses/belts with all the "correct" date codes and part numbers printed on them...

 

IMHO, such cars are good for nothing other than being trailered to snooty car shows, wiped with a diaper, then loaded back onto a trailer and taken back to hermatically sealed until the next snooty car show.

 

A term I hear more often is "restification", where a car is costmetically "restored" but modified for performance, reliability, comfort, etc.  These will usually look "stock" to the average person, other than maybe the wheels and tires.

 

Old Beetles would be a good choice, I believe.  In the U.S., there are a tremendous amount of choices for brand new parts.  You can bould a motor to be totally stock, or go wild with big-bore jugs, aftermarket heads, fuel injection,...  even kits to install Subaru turbocharged engines into them.

i've done a a couple magazine featured early beetles
lots of fun but things add up quick
people put tons of money in to classics and then feel disappointed when they don't drive or handle like new
as far as parts go for beetle anyways there is pretty much anything available

try the samba.com it will have some cars from the UK most will be in north america though

good luck and have fun with whatever you choose

Bringatrailer

Pistonheads

Whatever you want to spend...times it by 5. However long you think it will take to finish...times it by 10.

Pig Bun -

Most people do not grasp the meaning of the word "restore."  

 

It is a literal word, and to "restore" a car you are restoring it to the condition in which it left the factory.  No modern touches, no safety or performance improvements, no personalization.  If it came with shitty bias-ply whitewall tires, then it must have the same shitty tires to be truly "restored."  Old crappy batteries, old crappy radios and speakers, spark plug wires/hoses/belts with all the "correct" date codes and part numbers printed on them...

 

IMHO, such cars are good for nothing other than being trailered to snooty car shows, wiped with a diaper, then loaded back onto a trailer and taken back to hermatically sealed until the next snooty car show.

 

A term I hear more often is "restification", where a car is costmetically "restored" but modified for performance, reliability, comfort, etc.  These will usually look "stock" to the average person, other than maybe the wheels and tires.

 

Old Beetles would be a good choice, I believe.  In the U.S., there are a tremendous amount of choices for brand new parts.  You can bould a motor to be totally stock, or go wild with big-bore jugs, aftermarket heads, fuel injection,...  even kits to install Subaru turbocharged engines into them.

Restomod is the term usually used.

Spray paint a vw bug 

Barnicale Bill -

Pistonheads

I was just reading about a guy who had bought aftermarket piston heads and after a few thousand miles they all had identical fractures across the crown of the piston. So I'll definitely be looking for high quality parts.

Pig Bun -

Most people do not grasp the meaning of the word "restore."  

 

It is a literal word, and to "restore" a car you are restoring it to the condition in which it left the factory.  No modern touches, no safety or performance improvements, no personalization.  If it came with shitty bias-ply whitewall tires, then it must have the same shitty tires to be truly "restored."  Old crappy batteries, old crappy radios and speakers, spark plug wires/hoses/belts with all the "correct" date codes and part numbers printed on them...

 

IMHO, such cars are good for nothing other than being trailered to snooty car shows, wiped with a diaper, then loaded back onto a trailer and taken back to hermatically sealed until the next snooty car show.

 

A term I hear more often is "restification", where a car is costmetically "restored" but modified for performance, reliability, comfort, etc.  These will usually look "stock" to the average person, other than maybe the wheels and tires.

 

Old Beetles would be a good choice, I believe.  In the U.S., there are a tremendous amount of choices for brand new parts.  You can bould a motor to be totally stock, or go wild with big-bore jugs, aftermarket heads, fuel injection,...  even kits to install Subaru turbocharged engines into them.

Yeah anything I do will not be a true restoration. It will look original more than anything. I'll be getting aftermarket parts if it's cheaper than getting an original part.

Having rebuilt a couple I would advise you to find someone's project that they have been doing for a few years and they are trying to sell. For a first timer starting from scratch is the hardest and more people fail.