Russians find way to cheat at slot machines

FYI

 

 

Russians Engineer a Brilliant Slot Machine Cheat—And Casinos Have No Fix

 

 

In early June 2014, accountants at the Lumiere Place Casino in St. Louis noticed that several of their slot machines had—just for a couple of days—gone haywire. The government-approved software that powers such machines gives the house a fixed mathematical edge, so that casinos can be certain of how much they’ll earn over the long haul—say, 7.129 cents for every dollar played. But on June 2 and 3, a number of Lumiere’s machines had spit out far more money than they’d consumed, despite not awarding any major jackpots, an aberration known in industry parlance as a negative hold. Since code isn’t prone to sudden fits of madness, the only plausible explanation was that someone was cheating.

Casino security pulled up the surveillance tapes and eventually spotted the culprit, a black-haired man in his thirties who wore a Polo zip-up and carried a square brown purse. Unlike most slots cheats, he didn’t appear to tinker with any of the machines he targeted, all of which were older models manufactured by Aristocrat Leisure of Australia. Instead he’d simply play, pushing the buttons on a game like Star Drifter or Pelican Pete while furtively holding his iPhone close to the screen.

He’d walk away after a few minutes, then return a bit later to give the game a second chance. That’s when he’d get lucky. The man would parlay a $20 to $60 investment into as much as $1,300 before cashing out and moving on to another machine, where he’d start the cycle anew. Over the course of two days, his winnings tallied just over $21,000. The only odd thing about his behavior during his streaks was the way he’d hover his finger above the Spin button for long stretches before finally jabbing it in haste; typical slots players don’t pause between spins like that.

On June 9, Lumiere Place shared its findings with the Missouri Gaming Commission, which in turn issued a statewide alert. Several casinos soon discovered that they had been cheated the same way, though often by different men than the one who’d bilked Lumiere Place. In each instance, the perpetrator held a cell phone close to an Aristocrat Mark VI model slot machine shortly before a run of good fortune.

By examining rental-car records, Missouri authorities identified the Lumiere Place scammer as Murat Bliev, a 37-year-old Russian national. Bliev had flown back to Moscow on June 6, but the St. Petersburg–based organization he worked for, which employs dozens of operatives to manipulate slot machines around the world, quickly sent him back to the United States to join another cheating crew. The decision to redeploy Bliev to the US would prove to be a rare misstep for a venture that’s quietly making millions by cracking some of the gaming industry’s most treasured algorithms................

 

MORE:

 

 

https://www.wired.com/2017/02/russians-engineer-brilliant-slot-machine-cheat-casinos-no-fix/?mbid=synd_digg

 

Adds more credibility to the Trump/Russia Dossier

 

 

 

- Orcus

David@accu -


Adds more credibility to the Trump/Russia Dossier



 



 



 



- Orcus

Lol Pravda!

Hoping the wife can figure out his system.

David@accu - 


Adds more credibility to the Trump/Russia Dossier



 



 



 



- Orcus


lol

Havnt read the rest after the link. Is the iPhone held close to the machine part of the cheat? 

Joe O'Brien -
Morgz -

Havnt read the rest after the link. Is the iPhone held close to the machine part of the cheat? 

Probably some kind of visual/timing program that tells him when to press.
They were recording a series of spins, which were transmitted back to St. Petersburg. There, they could crack the pseudo random number generator. The operative would later return and look for a series of markers telling when they were more likely to win.

next time i'm in pechanga i'll just leave my finger on the button for awhile before pushing just to see if i get arrested.

EasyTapper -
Joe O'Brien -
Morgz -

Havnt read the rest after the link. Is the iPhone held close to the machine part of the cheat? 

Probably some kind of visual/timing program that tells him when to press.
They were recording a series of spins, which were transmitted back to St. Petersburg. There, they could crack the pseudo random number generator. The operative would later return and look for a series of markers telling when they were more likely to win.

Is that cheating though?

not cheating, but just like counting cards, the casino has the right to refuse service to anyone.

I believe it is cheating. There was a case where a guy found a bug in a system and exploited it. He gained millions from it. They caught him at the Silverton Casino in Vegas. There was a big article in wired magazine about it. Even though he found the bug legit, he still couldnt do what he did.

https://www.wired.com/2014/10/cheating-video-poker/

phydeau - not cheating, but just like counting cards, the casino has the right to refuse service to anyone.
It is cheating. Russians have been arrested, convicted, and are serving federal time

UltimateKeyboardWarrior -
phydeau - not cheating, but just like counting cards, the casino has the right to refuse service to anyone.
It is cheating. Russians have been arrested, convicted, and are serving federal time
Iirc, If any kind of device is involved to gain an advantage, it is cheating. You can count cards at bj in your head and its completely legal, even if you admit to doing it. You cannot use a device to do the exact same thing.

^^^ BTW, I used to work at a company that programmed interactive kiosks on casino floors all over the country. They gave out prizes, but by and large, very small stakes stuff.

Every once in a while though I would work on a project that had awards in the 50,000$ and up range.

I couldn't help but think of ways to cheat the program. You kind of have to think about it in order to protect against it. I thought of several ways to make them pay off at specific times in specific locations (perhaps to a pre determined person I may or may not know), but it would be very hard to fool the mandatory audit of the software that always follows a BIG WIN.

My girlfriend's parents won just over $243,000 in a nickel slot machine back in 1998. Squandered it. 

I thought casinos discouraged people from using phones while gambling?

So if I hold my phone up to the screen I can win ever time I push the button on the slots?

Trump: "Give this man a medal!"

 

lol nice

I lost $120 at a casino last night, where we these bastards to help me then, eh?