Saulos revolution set, worth purchasing?

uni JJ book is great and I have seen a couple of his clips.

How is the series compared to Science of JJ?

They are byfar the BEST vids to me, hands down. I'm not even the biggest saulo fan at all. but, his instructionals are hands down great. Get Jiu jitsu rev.


I didn't think you were allowed to be a member of this forum if you didn't own this set ?

FingerorMoon - 

I didn't think you were allowed to be a member of this forum if you didn't own this set ?


 

Yes.....pick them up first chance you get

YES!

I have to disagree a little. I own two of the Saulo gi DVD sets, and three of the Marcelo's, but these are the three sets I'd recommend getting first, in this order:

1. Ryan Halls "new" triangle series from groundfighter.com

http://www.groundfighter.com/Ryan-Hall-Instructional-DVDs/

2. Jeff Glover's Deep Half Guard

http://www.budovideos.com/shop/customer/product.php?productid=29007&cat=&page=1

3. Andre Galvao Jiu-Jitsu: Concepts, Details, Game Plan 5 DVD Set

http://www.budovideos.com/shop/customer/product.php?productid=28215&cat=&page=1

The way Ryan Hall looks at jiu jitsu - how to learn jiu jitsu and what kind of jiu jitsu you should learn - is thought-provoking, and the set listed above is his "new thinking" on the triangle since leaving Lloyd Irvin's academy. Since the triangle is one of the most fundamental submissions out there, yet people often have trouble finishing at tournaments, this is well worth getting. Ebay has this set much cheaper than the official groundfighter website.

Jeff Glover's Deep Half guard is worth getting because half guard is such an important position, and deep half guard is a position that smaller grapplers can use effective against larger grapplers, so if you are 160 pounds or below it's a really useful tool to have.

Andre Galvao's set is much more than a rehash or slight reinvention of basic moves you should already be learning at your academy. He has clean, effective, strong techniques that aren't beyond the grasp of mostly all blue belts, if you take the time to study, drill, practive, and are within the reach of better white belts (although you'd be better off taking more classes that trying to get ahead of yourself). This is fun if you have missed some classes or want a slightly different approach to surprise your classmates without lapsing into weird, one-off, You Tube home brew stuff.

Don't forget there are some pretty extensive and generous clips from the Saulo series at groundfighter and also on Ebay. Watch them and work them and see how they work for you. If they work really well, ignore my highly personal recommendations and by all means splurge and get the Saulo series. I didn't find them to be the magic bullet I had hoped for, but a lot of people swear by them and obviously Saulo is a master.

Yes, I agree that Saulo's Univ of Jiu Jitsu is the best book out there - I don't know if that is because the other books are out of date, or because Saulo has an incredible editor, or what - it's so darn handy, unlike a video you don't have turn it on and put the disk in, find the right disk and the right chapter. Univ of Jiu Jitsu has a solution for almost every common problem you'll find in a typical white/blue belt class, in case you missed the class at your academy that covered that point. Sometimes (deliberately so?) the solutions are unconventional, but they are a lot of fun to try even if they don't always work out the way expected (for example, try "scooping down" out of back mount).

Arguing whether one instructor's jiu jitsu, particularly taken from DVD's and books, is better or worse than what's at our own academies is, imho, senseless. Nowadays there is a lot of good bjj out there and if you attend tournaments you see a lot of winners from smaller or out of the way schools, it's not like some big name academies just dominate the winner's circle, so if one school or another's bjj is "new" or significantly "better" you'd expect to see it in results, and that doesn't seem to be the case. IMHO the best jiu jitsu comes from your own academy where your instructor can show you all the details in person, and explain the counters, recounters, defenses. Your instructor may not be as detailed as the DVD's, but at least he is THERE to resolve any questions. An extra 5 minutes trying to understand why he is telling you what he is telling you, is probably worth hours of watching DVD's.

Also don't forget competition footage. That's when you get to see what really works...and what doesn't. It's totally boring sometimes, and often hard to figure out what just happened and why, but it's time well spent.

Thanks egrbvr

My mate said this about the Saulo set:

"it's like watching a porno ... too much talking at the beginning so I had to fast forward the first few minutes of each chapter"

From the youtube clips I've seen ... I agree!

Let me know if you agree mate!

I will go train with him in a few weeks and mention that.