School me on pan frying filet mignon

Geoff G Electric -
Ninja_Chef - Dude !!
Season that bitch with kosher salt and Crust that motha fucka with some crushed peppercorns, yo !!

Pull out a cast iron pan and Heat up some goddam clarified butter up in that bitch.

Sear both sides hella muddafuckin hard until golden brown, my ninja.

Place in oven at 350 with some bitch ass rosemary, some motha fuckin cloves of garlic and shallots !!!

Baste yo meat every five minutes or so with a tablespoon until that motha fucka reaches internal temperature of 145 if your a pussy and 135 if you's a real bad ass motha fucka.

Remove from oven and let that bitch rest for 5 minutes. If you cut it too soon, sonuvabitch will bleed out like those motha fuckas I did up in county.

After yo meats rested, poor you a bourbon, and enjoy, my ninja. Phone Post 3.0
Works with lamb chops also !! Phone Post 3.0
Yesssssss...delicious lil lambs. I love them. As well as the lil oinkers... Phone Post 3.0

Always seared first never thought about doing the reverse. Sounds like fad. But I'll give it a shot. Phone Post 3.0

Get pan and oven as hot as possible.

Sear Steak 60 seconds on one side then 90 seconds on the other.

Pop it in pre-heated 500+ oven for 5 minutes and you will have a nice MR for a 2incher

gogoyoface703 - Get pan and oven as hot as possible.

Sear Steak 60 seconds on one side then 90 seconds on the other.

Pop it in pre-heated 500+ oven for 5 minutes and you will have a nice MR for a 2incher
I got a nice two incher for ya Phone Post 3.0

I thought sous vide was when you cooked food in an immersion circulator. So that you could reach an exarch temperature. But I only know what food network tells me. Phone Post 3.0

Fan of fanboys - 
UGCTT_AsimpleFan - I thought sous vide was when you cooked food in an immersion circulator. So that you could reach an exarch temperature. But I only know what food network tells me. Phone Post 3.0
No you're right.

So sous vide for steak people out it in at xxx degrees (I think low 100s but don't hold me to that) and cook steak part way. Again goal is slow to have a tender result. Then remove from sous vide and sear.

Since 99% of us (made up figure) don't own a sous vide machine we improvise. So bake in oven or grill indirect at a low temp. Then finish off with a sear. Phone Post 3.0

Are you high, mudda fucka !?!?! There is no way in bloody hell sous vide and trax method are not even remotely close !!! Trax method uses a DRY HEATING METHOD a sous vide uses a MOIST HEATING METHOD. sous vide machines were created so you can keep a steak at an exact temperature for X amount of time. then you remove it and sear it and be done with it.

a lot of commercial places use them, there are a a few HUGE ones in vegas for buffets.

Thread needs pics Phone Post

Season with spices.

Put oil and butter in pan. The butter adds flavour and also keeps the oil from popping as much.

Cook on LOW heat.

Flip steak OFTEN.

That's it. Easy. Phone Post 3.0

Fan of fanboys is correct here. I don't think sous vide is necessarily a wet cooking method. Yeah it's in a water bath but it is vacuum sealed and never actually in contact with any water. The water is a temperature transfer medium only. The reason it's used is because it holds a constant temperature much better than air and is easier to control. The reason it's in a bag is so it won't be a wet cook. In any event, the slow cooking in the oven before searing has many benefits, it's now how I do it inside. Heston Blumenthal has a 24hr steak that is oven cooked though he blowtorch sears first. America's test kitchen explains in detail why it is preferable to sear after the oven.

First off, searing does not seal in juices, that is a myth so we can get that out of the way.

Second, moisture. Wet steaks don't sear. And steaks coming off of the countertop will be a little wet. The oven rids the surface moisture. But there will still be moisture when you pull it. Luckily it is a special kind. Because when you salted the steak it is pulling a little bit of moisture from just under the surface. That moisture is chock full of protein. And protein=browning.

Also, there are enzymes at work in steak the second the animal is slaughtered. Refrigeration arrests that action which is why it will keep a while and why you can age a cut for two months, it's going slow. Heat it up to about 85 degrees I think and that enzymatic action kicks into overdrive. It will keep on cranking, essentially aging your steak like expensive chophouses until about 120 degrees, at which point the enzymes break down and the process stops. So the longer you keep the steak in that window the more tender and beefy your steak becomes. Nuclear pans and 500 degree ovens give a steak about 5 minutes in that window while a slow oven cook will give it about 20. Maybe not such an issue with the already tender filet but it is like magic on a sirloin.

Last is the sear itself.  What's it for?  It is to make the surface brown and crusty by caramelizing the proteins.  But what else does it tend to do?  Well, since you have to bring a room temperature steak up to the point where the reaction takes place it also makes a layer of gray, overcooked meat just under that brown surface.  So you have good brown crust, gray overdone mantle, and a nice medium rare core.  If your steak is already hot throughout then you cut the time needed to get the surface hot enough to brown.  That means less gray underneath.  So much so that mine don't really have any at all, they are completely medium rare throughout no matter if they are an inch thick or 3 inches thick.  Because since there isn't that cold core of steak pulling heat from the pan and prolonging the process it doesn't matter how thick the steak is, it will get a caramelized crust after less than a minute on each side.  

That, my friends, is why the old ways may not be the best ways.  

Also, I don't clean my grill grates and I am a steak flipping fool, I don't let a steak stay unflipped longer than a minute.  I don't want to go into that here but if you want to know why then look up why Adam Perry Lang does his steaks that way.  

Fan of fanboys - Phone Post 3.0
SEX Phone Post 3.0

Fan of fanboys -
Ninja_Chef -
Fan of fanboys - 
UGCTT_AsimpleFan - I thought sous vide was when you cooked food in an immersion circulator. So that you could reach an exarch temperature. But I only know what food network tells me. Phone Post 3.0
No you're right.

So sous vide for steak people out it in at xxx degrees (I think low 100s but don't hold me to that) and cook steak part way. Again goal is slow to have a tender result. Then remove from sous vide and sear.

Since 99% of us (made up figure) don't own a sous vide machine we improvise. So bake in oven or grill indirect at a low temp. Then finish off with a sear. Phone Post 3.0

Are you high, mudda fucka !?!?! There is no way in bloody hell sous vide and trax method are not even remotely close !!! Trax method uses a DRY HEATING METHOD a sous vide uses a MOIST HEATING METHOD. sous vide machines were created so you can keep a steak at an exact temperature for X amount of time. then you remove it and sear it and be done with it.

a lot of commercial places use them, there are a a few HUGE ones in vegas for buffets.
Reading is hard for some. I'll try using smaller words.


I never once said same thing. I said same concept. The concept, for about fourth time this thread, is start with a lower temp and slower cook then finish off with sear. I'm very familiar with each methods and how effects final results. Thanks to some kind forum members my blue was given to me bc of my cooking threads, I'm member of egghead forum, and I've been apart of the official egghead traveling BBQ team. Grilling is kind of something I spend more time and money on than most people. Phone Post 3.0
I didn't mean to get uppity, I just really really like food. My apologies if you thought I was starting a internet fight with you. Phone Post 3.0

In Phone Post

TTT

Sub Phone Post 3.0

Rhymenoceros - Searing steaks does not seal in juices. This has been a misconception since the 1800s when a German chemist claimed that all the protein was in the juice, and it was necessary for good nutrition to cauterize the meat to seal in the juices. He was wrong on all counts, but the myth remains. Phone Post 3.0
This Phone Post 3.0

I would link my "how I likely steak" thread but I'm not home.

Pan fried FTW!!!!! Phone Post 3.0

Like, not likey Phone Post 3.0

do you guys bake in the cast iron skillet, or move it to a different rack?

sreiter - do you guys bake in the cast iron skillet, or move it to a different rack?

If you're doing the sear first method, bake in the skillet, remove from skillet when you remove it from the oven.

crescentwrench - 


Fan of fanboys is correct here. I don't think sous vide is necessarily a wet cooking method. Yeah it's in a water bath but it is vacuum sealed and never actually in contact with any water. The water is a temperature transfer medium only. The reason it's used is because it holds a constant temperature much better than air and is easier to control. The reason it's in a bag is so it won't be a wet cook. In any event, the slow cooking in the oven before searing has many benefits, it's now how I do it inside. Heston Blumenthal has a 24hr steak that is oven cooked though he blowtorch sears first. America's test kitchen explains in detail why it is preferable to sear after the oven.



First off, searing does not seal in juices, that is a myth so we can get that out of the way.



Second, moisture. Wet steaks don't sear. And steaks coming off of the countertop will be a little wet. The oven rids the surface moisture. But there will still be moisture when you pull it. Luckily it is a special kind. Because when you salted the steak it is pulling a little bit of moisture from just under the surface. That moisture is chock full of protein. And protein=browning.



Also, there are enzymes at work in steak the second the animal is slaughtered. Refrigeration arrests that action which is why it will keep a while and why you can age a cut for two months, it's going slow. Heat it up to about 85 degrees I think and that enzymatic action kicks into overdrive. It will keep on cranking, essentially aging your steak like expensive chophouses until about 120 degrees, at which point the enzymes break down and the process stops. So the longer you keep the steak in that window the more tender and beefy your steak becomes. Nuclear pans and 500 degree ovens give a steak about 5 minutes in that window while a slow oven cook will give it about 20. Maybe not such an issue with the already tender filet but it is like magic on a sirloin.



Last is the sear itself.  What's it for?  It is to make the surface brown and crusty by caramelizing the proteins.  But what else does it tend to do?  Well, since you have to bring a room temperature steak up to the point where the reaction takes place it also makes a layer of gray, overcooked meat just under that brown surface.  So you have good brown crust, gray overdone mantle, and a nice medium rare core.  If your steak is already hot throughout then you cut the time needed to get the surface hot enough to brown.  That means less gray underneath.  So much so that mine don't really have any at all, they are completely medium rare throughout no matter if they are an inch thick or 3 inches thick.  Because since there isn't that cold core of steak pulling heat from the pan and prolonging the process it doesn't matter how thick the steak is, it will get a caramelized crust after less than a minute on each side.  



That, my friends, is why the old ways may not be the best ways.  



Also, I don't clean my grill grates and I am a steak flipping fool, I don't let a steak stay unflipped longer than a minute.  I don't want to go into that here but if you want to know why then look up why Adam Perry Lang does his steaks that way.  


I stand corrected, will have to try this.