Scientists discover why Roman concrete is strong

 

 

FYI

 

 

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Ancient Roman Concrete Is About to Revolutionize Modern Architecture

June 14, 2013
 

After 2,000 years, a long-lost secret behind the creation of one of the world’s most durable man-made creations ever—Roman concrete—has finally been discovered by an international team of scientists, and it may have a significant impact on how we build cities of the future.

As anyone who’s ever visited Italy knows, the ancient Romans were master engineers. Their roads, aqueducts, and temples are still holding up remarkably well despite coming under siege over the centuries by waves of sacking marauders, mobs of tourists, and the occasional earthquake. One such structure that has fascinated geologists and engineers throughout the ages is the Roman harbor. Over the past decade, researchers from Italy and the U.S. have analyzed 11 harbors in the Mediterranean basin where, in many cases, 2,000-year-old (and sometimes older) headwaters constructed out of Roman concrete stand perfectly intact despite constant pounding by the sea.

The most common blend of modern concrete, known as Portland cement, a formulation in use for nearly 200 years, can’t come close to matching that track record, says Marie Jackson, a research engineer at the University of California at Berkeley who was part of the Roman concrete research team. “The maritime environment, in particular, is not good for Portland concrete. In seawater, it has a service life of less than 50 years. After that, it begins to erode,” Jackson says.

The researchers now know why ancient Roman concrete is so superior. They extracted from the floor of Italy’s Pozzuoili Bay, in the northern tip of the Bay of Naples, a sample of concrete headwater that dates back to 37 B.C. and analyzed its mineral components at research labs in Europe and the U.S., including at Berkeley Lab’s Advanced Light Source. The analysis, the scientists believe, reveals the lost recipe of Roman concrete, and it also points to how much more stable and less environmentally damaging it is than today’s blend.................

 

MORE:

 

http://www.businessweek.com/articles/2013-06-14/ancient-roman-concrete-is-about-to-revolutionize-modern-architecture

 

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Awesome. Phone Post

Pretty cool stuff Phone Post 3.0

kanotoa - 

Roman concrete structures are truly amazing. I wonder if they were just lucky of if they really used the scientific method to develop their super concrete. Phone Post



trial and error = scientific method.. I'm sure they didn't come up with the best formula first try



 

How does this type of information become lost?

. Phone Post

I thought it was going to be something like they mixed in ground up bones of their rivals.

Probably some slave that came up the recipe, and Romans took credit for it. They like to take credit for other peoples stuff. Alot of great empires did.

So what's the secret ingredient for those who didn't read Phone Post 3.0

cool beans Phone Post 3.0

Lyme and volcanic ash Phone Post

Cool shit, interesting read. Phone Post

In Phone Post 3.0

Oppsicrappedmypants - So what's the secret ingredient for those who didn't read Phone Post 3.0
The blood of the innocent. Phone Post 3.0

Vinnie G -
Oppsicrappedmypants - So what's the secret ingredient for those who didn't read Phone Post 3.0
The blood of the innocent. Phone Post 3.0
Period blood or slit the throat blood? Phone Post 3.0

I was told YEARS ago that the mix contained volcanic, pulverized rocks and that was the key. Since the volcanic rock will not hold any moisture the concrete lasts forever.


Looks like the old head Italian guy was on to something.

I don't understand...are you telling me it took them this long to identify volcanic ash and lime?

In Phone Post 3.0

Moke - I don't understand...are you telling me it took them this long to identify volcanic ash and lime?
Yeah a team of scientists have been working for years testing the concrete and all it was is ash and Lyme lol Phone Post 3.0

Wow

So in Phone Post 3.0