Sport/Big game hunting.

This is probably where I stand the closest to the nutty left and right. I don't judge anyone for doing anything legal to do. But killing a beautiful important creature, and not using/consuming the animal, is a bitch move. I hunt and fish alot, I'll never kill anything for sport.

Yeah, well, the vast majority of hunters in the US eat what they kill. If you are talking about killing animals in Africa for the mount, I am with you there. I hunt, but I do it for the meat. I don't care to have a mount. I mean, if I killed some animal with massive horns, I may have it mounted, but meat is the #1 goal. 

I don't really care because I'd prefer a mass extinction event and/or post apocalyptic scenario where a majority of the populate died off and only the strong survived.

Don’t they still eat the meat though? They just stuff it right? 

If you catch and release then you are killing a shit ton more fish than you can imagine. Read up on the mortality rate - it will surprise you. 

 

In Africa, the locals eat the meat from safari hunts.

Except for wolves, shoot every one of those fuckers you see

That sport hunting also pays for conservation costs and protection. Check out the difference between Kenya and South Africa as far as wildlife populations. 

Luke Rockhard -

If you catch and release then you are killing a shit ton more fish than you can imagine. Read up on the mortality rate - it will surprise you. 

 

Not if you know how to handle the fish. It isn't difficult. Wet your hands before you grab them, use a net and keep them submerged as much as possible. Don't pick them up in a way that hurts their mid section. Set them in the water facing upstream and let them swim away, don't just toss them in the water. 

Luke Rockhard - 

If you catch and release then you are killing a shit ton more fish than you can imagine. Read up on the mortality rate - it will surprise you. 

 


Use flies and this statement becomes incorrect.

edit to add source: I have caught and released thousands of trout in tail-waters across the west for decades.
The largest fly I typically use is a 14. 18-24 are far more common for me. Very small hooks that catch the fishes "lip" 100% of the time.
Fish swallowing the giant hook while bait fishing is where you have ridiculously high mortality rates.

Phuckles -
Luke Rockhard -

If you catch and release then you are killing a shit ton more fish than you can imagine. Read up on the mortality rate - it will surprise you. 

 

Not if you know how to handle the fish. It isn't difficult. Wet your hands before you grab them, use a net and keep them submerged as much as possible. Don't pick them up in a way that hurts their mid section. Set them in the water facing upstream and let them swim away, don't just toss them in the water. 

This is all good advice for handling a fish but your assumption that doing these things will prevent the fish from dying is demonstrably false. 

There is instant mortality and delayed mortality. Just because the fish initially swims away does not mean it will survive. As a good example, most tournament anglers are very educated on the proper handling of fish, yet tournament fishing still accounts for 23% of mortality rates. There are plenty of studies on this. 

And using flies as the other poster stated has noting to do with trauma and other factors that lead to death in catch and release fish. The number one thing you can do to increase a fish’s chances of survival is to get it back in the water in under a minute. After one minute the rates for delayed mortality increase dramatically. 

Dryfly -
Luke Rockhard - 

If you catch and release then you are killing a shit ton more fish than you can imagine. Read up on the mortality rate - it will surprise you. 

 


Use flies and this statement becomes incorrect.

edit to add source: I have caught and released thousands of trout in tail-waters across the west for decades.
The largest fly I typically use is a 14. 18-24 are far more common for me. Very small hooks that catch the fishes "lip" 100% of the time.
Fish swallowing the giant hook while bait fishing is where you have ridiculously high mortality rates.

For sure gut hooking or gill hooking a fish will drastically reduce a fish’s chance of survival, but as I pointed out above there are many other contributing factors, including water temp and depth, exhaustion  (how long you played the fish to get it in), shock resulting from things like differences between water temp and ambient temp, time of exposure, method of handling, etc.

Most anglers assume that if a fish swims away under its own power then it will survive. Studies have shown us that this is not the case at all. 

 

Luke Rockhard - 
Phuckles -
Luke Rockhard -

If you catch and release then you are killing a shit ton more fish than you can imagine. Read up on the mortality rate - it will surprise you. 

 

Not if you know how to handle the fish. It isn't difficult. Wet your hands before you grab them, use a net and keep them submerged as much as possible. Don't pick them up in a way that hurts their mid section. Set them in the water facing upstream and let them swim away, don't just toss them in the water. 

This is all good advice for handling a fish but your assumption that doing these things will prevent the fish from dying is demonstrably false. 

There is instant mortality and delayed mortality. Just because the fish initially swims away does not mean it will survive. As a good example, most tournament anglers are very educated on the proper handling of fish, yet tournament fishing still accounts for 23% of mortality rates. There are plenty of studies on this. 

And using flies as the other poster stated has noting to do with trauma and other factors that lead to death in catch and release fish. The number one thing you can do to increase a fish’s chances of survival is to get it back in the water in under a minute. After one minute the rates for delayed mortality increase dramatically. 


I dunno:

"Question - What is the number one thing you as a fisherman can do to dramatically increase the survivability of fish you catch?
Answer – Use flies or lures instead of bait. Research indicates that 90% of fish caught on flies or lures will survive after being released. Furthermore, there is only a 1% to 2% difference in the survival rate of fish caught on flies compared to lures.

Fish caught on bait typically suffer a much higher mortality rate. About one third (33%) of fish caught on bait will die after being released and over 60% of deep hooked fish die. In general if the fish is bleeding it will not survive."



http://www.stoneflysociety.org/catchrelease.htm

billyball2 -
Luke Rockhard - 
Phuckles -
Luke Rockhard -

If you catch and release then you are killing a shit ton more fish than you can imagine. Read up on the mortality rate - it will surprise you. 

 

Not if you know how to handle the fish. It isn't difficult. Wet your hands before you grab them, use a net and keep them submerged as much as possible. Don't pick them up in a way that hurts their mid section. Set them in the water facing upstream and let them swim away, don't just toss them in the water. 

This is all good advice for handling a fish but your assumption that doing these things will prevent the fish from dying is demonstrably false. 

There is instant mortality and delayed mortality. Just because the fish initially swims away does not mean it will survive. As a good example, most tournament anglers are very educated on the proper handling of fish, yet tournament fishing still accounts for 23% of mortality rates. There are plenty of studies on this. 

And using flies as the other poster stated has noting to do with trauma and other factors that lead to death in catch and release fish. The number one thing you can do to increase a fish’s chances of survival is to get it back in the water in under a minute. After one minute the rates for delayed mortality increase dramatically. 


I dunno:

"Question - What is the number one thing you as a fisherman can do to dramatically increase the survivability of fish you catch?
Answer – Use flies or lures instead of bait. Research indicates that 90% of fish caught on flies or lures will survive after being released. Furthermore, there is only a 1% to 2% difference in the survival rate of fish caught on flies compared to lures.

Fish caught on bait typically suffer a much higher mortality rate. About one third (33%) of fish caught on bait will die after being released and over 60% of deep hooked fish die. In general if the fish is bleeding it will not survive."



http://www.stoneflysociety.org/catchrelease.htm

For one thing the article is from a site dedicated to fly fishing. There’s also no study data there to back up any of those claims. Gut hooking and gill hooking a fish will almost always kill them, and this is usually instant mortality. This should be obvious. But since I don’t know any pro fisherman or even any serious enthusiasts (fresh water anyway) who use live bait, it isn’t really an issue. The only artificial bait commonly used that would be prone to gut hooking would be like #1 hooks used for wacky rigging senkos. 

Fishing is about the only hobby I partake in anymore. I catch hundreds of fish each year and never gut hook them. Read some of the independent and university studies on the subject and it becomes very clear. Most anglers aren’t even aware of delayed mortality and just assume if the fish swims off then it survived, which is absolutely not the case. 

Luke Rockhard -
billyball2 -
Luke Rockhard - 
Phuckles -
Luke Rockhard -

If you catch and release then you are killing a shit ton more fish than you can imagine. Read up on the mortality rate - it will surprise you. 

 

Not if you know how to handle the fish. It isn't difficult. Wet your hands before you grab them, use a net and keep them submerged as much as possible. Don't pick them up in a way that hurts their mid section. Set them in the water facing upstream and let them swim away, don't just toss them in the water. 

This is all good advice for handling a fish but your assumption that doing these things will prevent the fish from dying is demonstrably false. 

There is instant mortality and delayed mortality. Just because the fish initially swims away does not mean it will survive. As a good example, most tournament anglers are very educated on the proper handling of fish, yet tournament fishing still accounts for 23% of mortality rates. There are plenty of studies on this. 

And using flies as the other poster stated has noting to do with trauma and other factors that lead to death in catch and release fish. The number one thing you can do to increase a fish’s chances of survival is to get it back in the water in under a minute. After one minute the rates for delayed mortality increase dramatically. 


I dunno:

"Question - What is the number one thing you as a fisherman can do to dramatically increase the survivability of fish you catch?
Answer – Use flies or lures instead of bait. Research indicates that 90% of fish caught on flies or lures will survive after being released. Furthermore, there is only a 1% to 2% difference in the survival rate of fish caught on flies compared to lures.

Fish caught on bait typically suffer a much higher mortality rate. About one third (33%) of fish caught on bait will die after being released and over 60% of deep hooked fish die. In general if the fish is bleeding it will not survive."



http://www.stoneflysociety.org/catchrelease.htm

For one thing the article is from a site dedicated to fly fishing. There’s also no study data there to back up any of those claims. Gut hooking and gill hooking a fish will almost always kill them, and this is usually instant mortality. This should be obvious. But since I don’t know any pro fisherman or even any serious enthusiasts (fresh water anyway) who use live bait, it isn’t really an issue. The only artificial bait commonly used that would be prone to gut hooking would be like #1 hooks used for wacky rigging senkos. 

Fishing is about the only hobby I partake in anymore. I catch hundreds of fish each year and never gut hook them. Read some of the independent and university studies on the subject and it becomes very clear. Most anglers aren’t even aware of delayed mortality and just assume if the fish swims off then it survived, which is absolutely not the case. 

I live a few minutes walk away from a blue ribbon Rocky Mountain tail-water.

I have fished quite literally every foot of about 30 miles of this river over the the years, but I fish the same section nearest my home very often.

I know for a fact that I have caught and released the same fish multiple times in a week.

I have read very many studies and have caught thousands of fish over about 5 decades. I think I have a clue.

Using a dryfly, a trout properly caught , handled, and released will live like 99% of the time.

A baitfishing caught trout that is released has an 80% chance of mortalitry according to my states fish and game.

All the above only applies to trout in Rocky Mountain tail-waters, spring creeks, and mountain streams. I know nothing of salt or deepwater fish.