Starting guitar, lesson recommendations?

What's up guys! I've been playing bass for about 18 years and I've decided to start playing guitar. Main goal is to get a better understanding of song writing and be a decent well rounded camp fire type guitar player. Sight read some lead sheets and song books with my daughter and other friends and family to sing along to. Not looking to be a lead player by any means. Rhythm playing with suit me just fine for a couple of years.

My schedule is slammed with responsibilities. College, work, daughter, the honey do list, and pajama wrasslin. So unfortunately I won't be able to sit down with an teacher. Wondering if you guys could recommend a website, instructional series, or a good YouTube channel that covers a wide array of techniques. My theory is strong, played in an Air Force band with concert groups, jazz, funk, and rock, ensembles, sight read bass clef, played predominately blues and jazz for the last 10 years, so I've got the musical knowledge pretty well covered for now. My main goal is to better understand chord progressions, changes and chord variations that build tension and resolve for writing purposes, and exercises for the technical aspect of both the left and right hand. If you've ever played bass I'm sure you know the technical aspects of playing are pretty far from each other.

So.... Any recommendations? I don't mind pay sites or spending good money for a comprehensive instructional. I can't tell you how much I've spent on real books and lesson plans from the bass greats. I currently have an electric and an amp. I'm into all styles of music but generally aspire to play classic style rock (Led Zeppelin to Allman bros to Sabbath), which I'm sure will cover the ability to jam along to some of favorite punk rock tunes, but I'd also like to be able to play stuff from the Eagles to the older country stuff my family likes sing along to. So I guess a more rock and blues influenced style. Pretty wide open! Haha. Sorry for the ramble. Thanks in advance!

double

I don't really know what's out there on video... so forgive me for answering a slightly different question. I also think there are other guys who know more about what's out there and can play what you're trying to play.

But... my 2 cents is based on being fairly good at one thing (in my case a different of guitar altogether, in your bass, in both cases reading music, on a staff....). I think you might do really well with at least the first two John Ganapes bookes, "Blues You Can Use" (copy/paste this: http://www.amazon.com/Blues-You-Can-Use/dp/0793542057/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1406861709&sr=1-1&keywords=blues+you+can+use )

The second one is "More Blues YOu Can Use" and might be more your speed -- the first one starts off very basic indeed, but the pace gets picked up pretty quick by the second book, at least. There are more in the series, "Blues Licks you can use..." "Rhythm and Blues you can use...." and maybe another couple. I've only ever seen the first two, and while, like I said, it might start off too basic for you, you can just find out where to start by thumbing through. (If you have a Sam Ash or someplace like that near you, they'll likely have the books).

Still, this is not video, and I get the appeal of that. I know there's a TON of free stuff on youtube, I just don't know what'd be up your alley.

That's cool, thanks man. I'm definitely down to go thru some books. Most of my Upright days were spent with a few good books and it worked really well. I'll check it out. Phone Post 3.0

TTT Phone Post 3.0

I did see on youtube this guy "MrClose2U" who has a bunch of videos of his own where he just plays the pieces (or exercises) in the order they're given in Blues You Can Use. The book comes with a cd, but it's nice to have at least something with video, too. So the "instruction" on what each of these is doesn't really show up in the video, but you can get an idea of how basic it starts and where it goes. Just look up "John Ganapes" on youtube, and you'll see this dude's stuff. They're numbered.

The first one:



and his "info" comments on what he's doing:

Over the last few months I have worked through the first half of the BYCU book. These videos are a record of my progress with some of the study pieces to date.
I have not been a very conscientious student though and have not stuck to a regular practice schedule so my progress is up and down.
I recorded studies 1-6 in one afternoon and 7-12 the next.
I have missed one lesson out of the chronology (Study 11 - Ninth Chord Blues) and I haven't started any others beyond study 12 yet.

I practiced each track a few times and then recorded a handful of takes until I got one I thought was good enough to keep.
When I have recorded videos before I have always had 'performance anxiety' and I know it is difficult recording 'the perfect take' so I didn't even try for it.
I thought I would just get on and record all the pieces I have learned to date.
In that way I'm hoping it is a fair representation of my learning progress and my overall skills and abilities at this moment.
That is why I have uploaded some that do have (to my ears) some obvious missed notes annd errors.
That's how I played them.
I deliberately chose to play with a clean tone so my playing would be exposed and areas for improvement would stand out.
I think this will help me to identify my weaknesses and the techniques and skills I have to work on to improve them.

I did the opposite and started with mostly rhythm guitar and then came to the bass. I always just found songs in the styles I liked, learned how to play them and do my best to understand what was going on. What you know on bass should carry over very well to rhtyhm guitar as both instruments are usually just describing the song harmony to the listener.

I like the Hal Leonard Method books, but they're probably more suited to complete beginners. There's Harmony by Walter Piston if you feel like reading the Old Testament of song writing, you can find scanned pdfs of it online pretty easy.

One thing I did when I crossed over was to take songs I knew well on guitar and learn the bass parts. Then I would record one and play with myself. I got a loop pedal for this eventually.

Right now, would you say you can play open and barre chord shapes on the guitar or are you still working up to that?

Invisible Lats Syndrome - I did the opposite and started with mostly rhythm guitar and then came to the bass. I always just found songs in the styles I liked, learned how to play them and do my best to understand what was going on. What you know on bass should carry over very well to rhtyhm guitar as both instruments are usually just describing the song harmony to the listener.

I like the Hal Leonard Method books, but they're probably more suited to complete beginners. There's Harmony by Walter Piston if you feel like reading the Old Testament of song writing, you can find scanned pdfs of it online pretty easy.

One thing I did when I crossed over was to take songs I knew well on guitar and learn the bass parts. Then I would record one and play with myself. I got a loop pedal for this eventually.

Right now, would you say you can play open and barre chord shapes on the guitar or are you still working up to that?
The open M, m, M7, m7, and 7 chords I've got. I'm still working on getting the Barre chords smooth in transition. Generally only have problems when switching during a fast passage. Phone Post 3.0

Sounds like you're on your way then.