straight punch question

my trainner keeps on yelling at me because i flare out my elbows when i throw a left jab or right straight. I don't understand how to correct these problems. We probably sat there for about fourty five minutes in a private lesson going over this and i left not feeling any better about it. He's telling me to keep my elbows tight to my body and punch like i was going to do a close grip bench press, then turn it over at the end like screwing a screw driver. Are there any picks on the web that someone could link me to so i can get this right, and move on. Its extremely frustrating when i can not figure something out. Thanks in advance!

Punch in super slow motion, keeping the elbow pointed down until you are almost extended, then roll the wrist over and allow the elbow to point away from your body. You should start to roll the wrist about 3/4 straight.

Elbows flaring is a big deal for 2 major reasons 1. your fist lines up in front of the elbow, if the elbow is out away from the body you will not be hitting with your weight behind your punch, making it much less powerful. 2. A decent fighter, or even only an average guy can see the elbow flare and it is a HUGE telegraph.

that is exactly what my trainner was telling me that i started with my elbow first and that he could catch the punch every time. Then i started looking in the mirror and noticed what he was talking about. But now i'm having a problem of not feeling natural or correct when i'm try and punch the way he wants me to.

try this product out at Ringside:

http://www.ringside.com/store/prodinfo.asp?number=ZELBIN&variation=&aitem=9&mitem=44

just keep doing it. it will start to feel natural if you keep practicing it.

Do you do a lot of shadow boxing? Either way, you should be doing more. Also, maybe your trainer can give you a shot to the ribs every time you do it. You don't have to buy the ringside product either, you can make a cheapo by getting some rubber tubing.

I had this problem for a long time. Eventually my instructor had me punch with a vertical fist, I found it easier to keep my elbow in, almost like an "upper cross." I punched vertically for a while, then started turning my fist over and voila, elbow in.

I had this problem for a long time. Eventually my instructor had me punch with a vertical fist, I found it easier to keep my elbow in, almost like an "upper cross." I punched vertically for a while, then started turning my fist over and voila, elbow in.

Try shadow boxing with a bag glove pinched between your side and your arm, with your hands up. It will not only help you keep your hands up, but keep you tight. When that feels natural, punching from that position straight out should become easier.

Creating training:

two pieces of string and two rings (I used those rings you get for keys), put the rings on the string and attach them across the room, head height, shoulder width apart. Now tape your index fingers to the rings so that a closed fist and guard position makes your hands and forearms hang vertically. Now you can extend you punch down the string, you will not extend fully nor turn you hand over, similar toe Kichigai X's uppercross, but it will teach you the proper shoulder mechanics, it's also a great way to stop "spooning" punches (punches that go out straight but come back below the shoulder). Once you have the mechanics down, lose the string, and at the point where you would stop on the string, rotate your shoulder to turn hand over. And voila as they say.

just wanted to say thanks!!! all these replies have been completely awesome. Everyone has great ideas, and i have already tried some and i'm going to try others soon. This really has been a help, and i can tell you guys know your stuff. I wasn't sure if this board was a bunch of young wanna-be kids. But apparently not.

Mitts work for a seasoned guy who already punches properly and has good form. WILL NOT WORK with most new guys (as far as making them keep elbows in while punching) because the stress included with form training is a bad idea for newbies. Causes them to break down rather than build up. Better to let them do stress free drills first and build up to the pad pressure.