Teaching Children - illegal techniques

Do you teach only competition legal techniques to children?

I understand most of these are illegal for safety, but i thought it interesting that front guillotine made the list. A few of my students have come from other schools where this is legal. They keep asking to go over it. It is one of my main attacks (and arm triangles) but we generally try to stay within competition rules.

Some of the techniques on the list I would probably shy away from due to possible injury or difficulty at that age, but it seems guillotine should not be on that list. After all, most kids when fighting (most adults as well) go straight to grab the head.

Knowing that in order to defend something you have to understand it, it would seem guillotines would be very important to teach. My coach told me they were legal before but he doesn't remember exactly when.

List of illegal techniques:
Submission techniques stretching legs apart
Choke with spinal lock
Straight foot lock
Forearm choke using the sleeve (Ezequiel choke)
Frontal guillotine choke
Omoplata
Triangle (pulling head)
Arm triangle
Lock inside the closed guard with legs compressing kidneys or ribs
Wrist lock
Single leg takedown while the attacking athlete
has his head outside his opponents body.
Bicep slicer
Calf slicer
Knee bar
Toe hold
Slam
Spinal lock without choke
Heel hook
Locks twisting the knees.
Knee Ripping (See definition in page 26)
Scissor Takedown
In straight foot lock, turning in the direction
of foot not under attack.
In toe hold, applying outward pressure on the foot
Bending fingers backwards
Grab the opponents belt and throws him to the floor on his head
when defending a single leg situation while his opponents head
is on the outside of his body

.

I suppose the risk is that in competition that arm triangles and guillotines can become neck cranks maybe?

Just teach them properly and it should be fine.

Maybe don't allow it in sparring until you trust the kids in question but I would teach it for sure.

Anything spinal is illegal. The stress a front guillotine puts on the neck. Kids are obviously not fully developed so there for there is greater risk with certain techniques. Phone Post 3.0

killthetraitor, I understand that. My concern is that in a school yard fight, kids typically go for headlocks and guillotines (just not that technically). The likelihood of a bully doing an arm triangle is low, but kids should be taught how to defend headlocks and guillotines. Again, these are competition rules, not all schools teach to them. I was just wondering what other instructors of kids teach, again these are 9-13 yr olds.

Mine has used some jiujitsu moves to great effect in the wrestling room when things get a little crazy.

When he was 9 he choked a 12 year old purple with a RNC from top. The 12 year old had been beating him silly all night, not just out wrestling him but actually roughing him up, even while drilling. It was amazing what a good partner he became after that. Phone Post 3.0

^^like purple in the face, not a 12 yr old purple belt obviously Phone Post 3.0

I had a girl rnc from the bottom and almost pull the boy's spine out. Even at this age, many times I have to verbally tap for the students.

That technique was in the Fighters Notebook.

Do it from guard and stretch them out with your legs.

JosephConnolly - killthetraitor, I understand that. My concern is that in a school yard fight, kids typically go for headlocks and guillotines (just not that technically). The likelihood of a bully doing an arm triangle is low, but kids should be taught how to defend headlocks and guillotines. Again, these are competition rules, not all schools teach to them. I was just wondering what other instructors of kids teach, again these are 9-13 yr olds.

Oh I agree 100%. I teach our kids headlock defense in a seperate self defense class. Does not involve live sparring so they understand the difference between training and defending yourself. Phone Post 3.0

For my advanced kids I teach bicep locks, calf crushes, ankle locks, omo platas, go go platas, arm triangles and banana splits

I emphasize safety and make them tap early to those techniques and have a pretty mature group we haven't had any injuries from those techniques. Armbars and kimuras are actually the submissions that have the most injuries.

killthetraitor, a separate class/week/time just on self defense might be a good idea to start bringing in some of those non-competition aspects. thanks.

I prepare my kids for life not competition so I teach everything but heel hooks to each and everyone of my kids. Phone Post 3.0

Jason Manly - I prepare my kids for life not competition so I teach everything but heel hooks to each and everyone of my kids. Phone Post 3.0

I'm with Mr. Manly on this. If one is going to compete, we'll work on what he can and can't do. Other than that we teach them everything but make sure to stress that what they're being taught can do serious damage and that even if his partner is being stubborn in training and not tapping to not crank anything.