The most terrible Bible story of all

 

Stupid app. It's Judges 19. It's not too long. I'll post here.

Did you eat a handful of quaaludes?

Get a life, faggot. Must be a pretty miserable existence when you’re posting threads like this.

Judges 19 New International Version (NIV)
A Levite and His Concubine
19 In those days Israel had no king.

Now a Levite who lived in a remote area in the hill country of Ephraim took a concubine from Bethlehem in Judah. 2 But she was unfaithful to him. She left him and went back to her parents’ home in Bethlehem, Judah. After she had been there four months, 3 her husband went to her to persuade her to return. He had with him his servant and two donkeys. She took him into her parents’ home, and when her father saw him, he gladly welcomed him. 4 His father-in-law, the woman’s father, prevailed on him to stay; so he remained with him three days, eating and drinking, and sleeping there.

5 On the fourth day they got up early and he prepared to leave, but the woman’s father said to his son-in-law, “Refresh yourself with something to eat; then you can go.” 6 So the two of them sat down to eat and drink together. Afterward the woman’s father said, “Please stay tonight and enjoy yourself.” 7 And when the man got up to go, his father-in-law persuaded him, so he stayed there that night. 8 On the morning of the fifth day, when he rose to go, the woman’s father said, “Refresh yourself. Wait till afternoon!” So the two of them ate together.

9 Then when the man, with his concubine and his servant, got up to leave, his father-in-law, the woman’s father, said, “Now look, it’s almost evening. Spend the night here; the day is nearly over. Stay and enjoy yourself. Early tomorrow morning you can get up and be on your way home.” 10 But, unwilling to stay another night, the man left and went toward Jebus (that is, Jerusalem), with his two saddled donkeys and his concubine.

11 When they were near Jebus and the day was almost gone, the servant said to his master, “Come, let’s stop at this city of the Jebusites and spend the night.”

12 His master replied, “No. We won’t go into any city whose people are not Israelites. We will go on to Gibeah.” 13 He added, “Come, let’s try to reach Gibeah or Ramah and spend the night in one of those places.” 14 So they went on, and the sun set as they neared Gibeah in Benjamin. 15 There they stopped to spend the night. They went and sat in the city square, but no one took them in for the night.

16 That evening an old man from the hill country of Ephraim, who was living in Gibeah (the inhabitants of the place were Benjamites), came in from his work in the fields. 17 When he looked and saw the traveler in the city square, the old man asked, “Where are you going? Where did you come from?”

18 He answered, “We are on our way from Bethlehem in Judah to a remote area in the hill country of Ephraim where I live. I have been to Bethlehem in Judah and now I am going to the house of the Lord.[a] No one has taken me in for the night. 19 We have both straw and fodder for our donkeys and bread and wine for ourselves your servants—me, the woman and the young man with us. We don’t need anything.”

20 “You are welcome at my house,” the old man said. “Let me supply whatever you need. Only don’t spend the night in the square.” 21 So he took him into his house and fed his donkeys. After they had washed their feet, they had something to eat and drink.

22 While they were enjoying themselves, some of the wicked men of the city surrounded the house. Pounding on the door, they shouted to the old man who owned the house, “Bring out the man who came to your house so we can have sex with him.”

23 The owner of the house went outside and said to them, “No, my friends, don’t be so vile. Since this man is my guest, don’t do this outrageous thing. 24 Look, here is my virgin daughter, and his concubine. I will bring them out to you now, and you can use them and do to them whatever you wish. But as for this man, don’t do such an outrageous thing.”

25 But the men would not listen to him. So the man took his concubine and sent her outside to them, and they raped her and abused her throughout the night, and at dawn they let her go. 26 At daybreak the woman went back to the house where her master was staying, fell down at the door and lay there until daylight.

27 When her master got up in the morning and opened the door of the house and stepped out to continue on his way, there lay his concubine, fallen in the doorway of the house, with her hands on the threshold. 28 He said to her, “Get up; let’s go.” But there was no answer. Then the man put her on his donkey and set out for home.

29 When he reached home, he took a knife and cut up his concubine, limb by limb, into twelve parts and sent them into all the areas of Israel. 30 Everyone who saw it was saying to one another, “Such a thing has never been seen or done, not since the day the Israelites came up out of Egypt. Just imagine! We must do something! So speak up!”

EluThingol -

Stupid app. It's Judges 19. It's not too long. I'll post here.

Pretty fucked up story. What the hell was the purpose of it?

BruteDion - 
EluThingol -

Stupid app. It's Judges 19. It's not too long. I'll post here.

Pretty fucked up story. What the hell was the purpose of it?


I'm doing research to figure that out now.

thanks, Midget. The phone app doesn't let me copy and paste anymore, so I was moving to my Mac.

It's explained in Judges 20, where the payback for the rape gets downright biblical.

I'm reading a novel by an Israeli biblical scholar that played around with the idea that this story was propaganda spread by David and Solomon, who were from the tribe of Judah, against supporters of Saul, who was a Benjaminite.

https://www.amazon.com/Secret-Book-Kings-Novel/dp/1250076986

If you are interested.

effinggoof - It's explained in Judges 20, where the payback for the rape gets downright biblical.


damn, just read it.

So this is what happened.

The dude whose concubine was raped and murdered cuts her up and sends her pieces all over Israel. The story spreads, and the Israeli tribes band together and decide to confront the Benjamites about this. The tell them to give up the killers. The Benjamites refuse, and so starts a war.

First day, Benjamites succeed and kill 18,000 Israeli, next day, more of the same. Third day, Israel lays a plan. They end up destroying the Benjamite army, raiding their cities, and killing everything(animals, and I assume women and children).

Goddamn. These stories need to be made on Netflix.

Onikage - Did you eat a handful of quaaludes?

If by quaaludes, you mean the shitty mma.tv app, then yes.

IHeartBoobies - 

Get a life, faggot. Must be a pretty miserable existence when you’re posting threads like this.


haha. project much?

cliffs? 

EluThingol - 
effinggoof - It's explained in Judges 20, where the payback for the rape gets downright biblical.


damn, just read it.

So this is what happened.

The dude whose concubine was raped and murdered cuts her up and sends her pieces all over Israel. The story spreads, and the Israeli tribes band together and decide to confront the Benjamites about this. The tell them to give up the killers. The Benjamites refuse, and so starts a war.

First day, Benjamites succeed and kill 18,000 Israeli, next day, more of the same. Third day, Israel lays a plan. They end up destroying the Benjamite army, raiding their cities, and killing everything(animals, and I assume women and children).

Goddamn. These stories need to be made on Netflix.

This story has some parallels with the Sodom and Gomorrah story, with the distinction that the Sodomites were not Jews, while the Benjamites were.

In the case of Sodom, God punished them directly.

In the case of the Benjamites, the other Jews did the punishing.

BTW, the Benjamites protecting the rapists instead of doing the right thing seems like a parable about the dangers of identity politics.

EluThingol -
effinggoof - It's explained in Judges 20, where the payback for the rape gets downright biblical.


damn, just read it.

So this is what happened.

The dude whose concubine was raped and murdered cuts her up and sends her pieces all over Israel. The story spreads, and the Israeli tribes band together and decide to confront the Benjamites about this. The tell them to give up the killers. The Benjamites refuse, and so starts a war.

First day, Benjamites succeed and kill 18,000 Israeli, next day, more of the same. Third day, Israel lays a plan. They end up destroying the Benjamite army, raiding their cities, and killing everything(animals, and I assume women and children).

Goddamn. These stories need to be made on Netflix.

Dman thats actually a really dam good idea. That would make an awesome show.

The book is called judges cause its meant to be a book about learning how to judge evil

I like the story about the guy who was put to death for using the withdrawal method on his dead brother's wife.

Genesis 38

effinggoof -
EluThingol - 
effinggoof - It's explained in Judges 20, where the payback for the rape gets downright biblical.
 

damn, just read it.

So this is what happened.

The dude whose concubine was raped and murdered cuts her up and sends her pieces all over Israel. The story spreads, and the Israeli tribes band together and decide to confront the Benjamites about this. The tell them to give up the killers. The Benjamites refuse, and so starts a war.

First day, Benjamites succeed and kill 18,000 Israeli, next day, more of the same. Third day, Israel lays a plan. They end up destroying the Benjamite army, raiding their cities, and killing everything(animals, and I assume women and children).

Goddamn. These stories need to be made on Netflix.

This story has some parallels with the Sodom and Gomorrah story, with the distinction that the Sodomites were not Jews, while the Benjamites were.

In the case of Sodom, God punished them directly.

In the case of the Benjamites, the other Jews did the punishing.

BTW, the Benjamites protecting the rapists instead of doing the right thing seems like a parable about the dangers of identity politics.
 

In the wider view, identity is exactly what the story was about. The Book of Kings, like most of the Tanakh, was compiled during the Babylonian exile. During that time, the writers had to deal with three questions: Why did these horrible things happen? What can we do to correct them? And, probably most importantly, what do we do now that we have been displaced from our tribal homelands? Tribal birthright didn't have much of a place anymore and all of the tribes were mixed together. They had to find a common identity, but, and this is where things get interesting in the Bible once you realize this, they were doing so when most of what was left of the elite class were from the tribe of Judah.

In the Book of Judges there is the continual cycle of the tribes falling away from the Law, fighting each other, being punished with war from outside groups, then being united under a single figure who restores order and fights off the enemy, which leads to favor from Hashem. Rinse and repeat. That answers those questions.

The macro-story of the Tanakh is the transformation of a tribal confederation into Jews. And that carried over into Christianity because Jesus's legitimacy relied on him coming from the line of Judah. It also adds another layer to the story of the Good Samaritan.

I'd be really curious to find out if the same story exists in Samaritan texts, since the Samaritans are the descendants of the tribes descended from Rachel; Benjamin, Ephraim, and Manasseh, and the Levites who lived with them, who were the core of the Kingdom of Israel.

I always thought God telling Abraham too kill Issac and then say "JK LOL You don't have too." right before he does it was always sort of fucked up imo.