The official OG BBQ thread. Share what you know

Well since no one ever goes to the food, wine and whatever forum we need an official OG thread for BBQ go to recipes and experiments. This is the place. Show what you know. I experiment with other recipes and techniques a lot. I'll post the results of the experiments on here. Recently I experimented with the 3-2-1 rib method using pork spare ribs. Here were my findings.



Over the years I have heard about the 3-2-1 method over and over again. I have never tried this exact method until recently because I have my own method for ribs that turns out excellent. I have always disagreed with the 3-2-1 method, but I never gave it a chance myself. So, I did two smokes using the method faithfully and to the letter. For those that don't know the 3-2-1 it is 3 hours smoke, 2 hours wrapped and 1 hour unwrapped all at 225 degrees. I have always felt that is far too long to cook ribs. Here are the results of two legit 3-2-1 smokes.


I was absolutely right. The ribs are far too overcooked. I held 225 exactly the entire smoke and went to the minute on the times. While delicious, the bones all pulled clean. There was no chewiness left in the meat. I can say with 100% confidence that 3-2-1 will not work for ribs. Not if you want them cooked correctly. I personally use closer to a 2-1-30min method. I get good bark and great taste in that time. I'll update this thread the next time I do ribs.


Also, I got a cast iron hotplate that I use in my green egg now and then. It is grooved on one side and flat on the other. It is absolutely perfect for steaks. I get a near perfect sear every time. Would highly recommend it.

Also, this weekend I am smoking two pork butts with 2 different methods. I plan to brine one and inject the other. One will be a Hawaiian style sweet pulled pork for sandwiches and the other will be a Mexican style heavily spiced pork I plan to use for burritos, tacos and enchiladas.


I have done the brine vs. injection test before with brine winning overwhelmingly. But I can't call it officially until I have done the experiment twice and it produce the same result. I'll post the results here of course.

So, when smoking. Can you use any wood? Is there a ratio of wood to heat to weight of meat? Phone Post 3.0

TFK_Tom O'Bedlam - So, when smoking. Can you use any wood? Is there a ratio of wood to heat to weight of meat? Phone Post 3.0

No you can't use any wood. I mean you can, but some can make your meat taste like crap and there are others like green cottonwood that you should avoid.

Certain meats pair up with certain woods better than others.

TFK_Tom O'Bedlam - So, when smoking. Can you use any wood? Is there a ratio of wood to heat to weight of meat? Phone Post 3.0

http://amazingribs.com/tips_and_technique/zen_of_wood.html

Here is a good article about it.

You can use any wood, just make sure to temper it before putting your meat on. When you first put wood onto the fire it is a white smoke. Let it burn for a bit and it will turn to a cool blue smoke. That's when you know it is ready. You can use all sorts of wood for different flavors. Being a Texas guy I love mesquite. It is the taste we expect and what we grew up with. I usually stick to mesquite and pecan, but you can use almost all fruit woods. Peach, apple, apricot, you name it. Also you can use husks from pecans if you don't have actual pecan wood. Hickory and post oak are pretty normal as well. You can find wood chips at almost any grocery store and places that sell grills. Just toss a handful on some charcoal and you'll add a lot of flavor to whatever you are cooking. If you are cooking on gas you can make am aluminum foil bowl and put some chips in it to get smoke on those grills as well.

Wow, that article is detailed. No sir, it hurts mah brain! I was told there would be no math

Big Pun - You can use any wood, just make sure to temper it before putting your meat on. When you first put wood onto the fire it is a white smoke. Let it burn for a bit and it will turn to a cool blue smoke. That's when you know it is ready. You can use all sorts of wood for different flavors. Being a Texas guy I love mesquite. It is the taste we expect and what we grew up with. I usually stick to mesquite and pecan, but you can use almost all fruit woods. Peach, apple, apricot, you name it. Also you can use husks from pecans if you don't have actual pecan wood. Hickory and post oak are pretty normal as well. You can find wood chips at almost any grocery store and places that sell grills. Just toss a handful on some charcoal and you'll add a lot of flavor to whatever you are cooking. If you are cooking on gas you can make am aluminum foil bowl and put some chips in it to get smoke on those grills as well.
Fellow Texan here as well. I love mesquite smoked anything. And since there's an abundance of pecans on the ground every year I might as well take advantage of that. I want to buy my first smoker before summer. Probably just start with a cheap one from a local place. Phone Post 3.0

Something I have been doing lately is layering my fire. I use a charcoal base, then I put in some wood chunks (never soaked) and top it off with more charcoal. Basically it is one chimney of natural lump charcoal, then the wood chunks (usually straight mesquite) and another chimney of charcoal on the top. Then I let that go for 15 minutes to get some blue smoke and I adjust my temp from there. Once I have the temp holding steady it's on. I am unsure if it is just a mental thing or not, but I swear it works best. This is for BBQing not grilling of course. For fast grills I just dump a chimney and toss some chips/small chunks on the top.

TFK_Tom O'Bedlam - 
Big Pun - You can use any wood, just make sure to temper it before putting your meat on. When you first put wood onto the fire it is a white smoke. Let it burn for a bit and it will turn to a cool blue smoke. That's when you know it is ready. You can use all sorts of wood for different flavors. Being a Texas guy I love mesquite. It is the taste we expect and what we grew up with. I usually stick to mesquite and pecan, but you can use almost all fruit woods. Peach, apple, apricot, you name it. Also you can use husks from pecans if you don't have actual pecan wood. Hickory and post oak are pretty normal as well. You can find wood chips at almost any grocery store and places that sell grills. Just toss a handful on some charcoal and you'll add a lot of flavor to whatever you are cooking. If you are cooking on gas you can make am aluminum foil bowl and put some chips in it to get smoke on those grills as well.
Fellow Texan here as well. I love mesquite smoked anything. And since there's an abundance of pecans on the ground every year I might as well take advantage of that. I want to buy my first smoker before summer. Probably just start with a cheap one from a local place. Phone Post 3.0

I've had $20 charcoal grills and currently a big green egg. You can produce great food on any of them. I keep pecan husks in a 5 gallon bucket. I have a couple acres on the river near San Saba, TX and I have several native pecan trees on it. I always save a bucket of husks. When you are doing burgers or quick fire stuff just toss a handful onto the fire and you are good to go man

I live in Washington state, and hardwoods are more difficult to find. We have tons of fir and pine, which are unacceptable for BBQ. We have to use Alder or Apple for the most part.

The main thing I do is whole hog. I try to peg the temp at 145 for a minimum of 8, but usually 10-16 hours.

I don't do much smaller batch BBQ except steaks, chicken & fish. We BBQ tons of fish up here, salmon is everywhere, but halibut, cod, ling-cod and many others do well on the grill.

LeroyJ - I live in Washington state, and hardwoods are more difficult to find. We have tons of fir and pine, which are unacceptable for BBQ. We have to use Alder or Apple for the most part.

The main thing I do is whole hog. I try to peg the temp at 145 for a minimum of 8, but usually 10-16 hours.

I don't do much smaller batch BBQ except steaks, chicken & fish. We BBQ tons of fish up here, salmon is everywhere, but halibut, cod, ling-cod and many others do well on the grill.

But that apple wood is the shit! Phone Post 3.0

Big Pun - Well since no one ever goes to the food, wine and whatever forum we need an official OG thread for BBQ go to recipes and experiments. This is the place. Show what you know. I experiment with other recipes and techniques a lot. I'll post the results of the experiments on here. Recently I experimented with the 3-2-1 rib method using pork spare ribs. Here were my findings.



Over the years I have heard about the 3-2-1 method over and over again. I have never tried this exact method until recently because I have my own method for ribs that turns out excellent. I have always disagreed with the 3-2-1 method, but I never gave it a chance myself. So, I did two smokes using the method faithfully and to the letter. For those that don't know the 3-2-1 it is 3 hours smoke, 2 hours wrapped and 1 hour unwrapped all at 225 degrees. I have always felt that is far too long to cook ribs. Here are the results of two legit 3-2-1 smokes.


I was absolutely right. The ribs are far too overcooked. I held 225 exactly the entire smoke and went to the minute on the times. While delicious, the bones all pulled clean. There was no chewiness left in the meat. I can say with 100% confidence that 3-2-1 will not work for ribs. Not if you want them cooked correctly. I personally use closer to a 2-1-30min method. I get good bark and great taste in that time. I'll update this thread the next time I do ribs.


Also, I got a cast iron hotplate that I use in my green egg now and then. It is grooved on one side and flat on the other. It is absolutely perfect for steaks. I get a near perfect sear every time. Would highly recommend it.
I feel you're dead on about the 3-2-1. I did that recently and I also felt the ribs were overcooked. The color and flavor were there but I just think that 2 hours wrapped is way too long. I prefer the 3-1-1 method. When I take them out of the foil for the last hour, that's when I put in some sauce to let it cook on for that last hour and give the final product that stickyness it needs. Phone Post 3.0

Sub Phone Post 3.0

UP

Big eyed fish had a great thread on Smoking. I'll bump if I can find it. Phone Post 3.0

Pictures really don't do this blade the justice it deserves. They can't capture the reflective blue tint of the steel or the richness and depth of the wood. Phone Post 3.0

Stupid top men! This is not the thread I was on! Phone Post 3.0

TFK_Tom O'Bedlam - Stupid top men! This is not the thread I was on! Phone Post 3.0

Damn the man!!