Thinking about buying a motorcycle.. TME

I started earlier this spring. Took the safety course, bought the gear and settled on a Yamaha R3. Great decision starting small cc in my experience. Its power to weight ratio is perfect for a beginner to gain technique and confidence over time. Also, it handles freeway traffic with ease.

In short, I second the idea of starting small. Phone Post 3.0

In. Similar thoughts going on. Phone Post 3.0

Some good advice here. I too like the 883, and while I agree they look cool, don't let that decide what you buy imo.
Since you are a new rider, the likely hood of you at the very least dropping the bike is high.
I would recommend getting something small, 500-600cc. Get the feel of riding, take the course, ride for a year or longer, then move to the bigger "cooler" bikes. Just my 2 cents. Phone Post 3.0

RIP OP Phone Post 3.0

A lot of thoughtful advice in this thread.

If you have the opportunity to get on something small, like an 80 or 125 dirtbike, do it. It's the fastest way to learn the fundamentals with the least consequences. When you transition to something bigger, you'll already know how all the controls work - what they do.

Starting on a smaller cc bike will give you confidence more quickly. That said, if your heart is set on the Harley, I'd just get it. Though it might be a little on the heavy side for your first bike, it has the benefit of a v-twin (flat torque curve) and low saddle height (will allow you to flat-foot it). both helpful if you're a beginner.

Yes, definitely take the MSF course.

And remember, ATGATT - All The Gear All The Time.

If you only care about half your head, then wear one of those half-helmets.

vandizzam - RIP OP Phone Post 3.0
This, put us in your will first. Do you fully trust ever other moron on the road with your life? If yes get a motorcycle Phone Post 3.0

Retired Blue Belt -
Curtis_E_Bare - How old are you? My motorcycle advice is heavily influenced by maturity level. Phone Post 3.0
I am 31. Phone Post 3.0
I've a bud who bought cruiser at thirty. He'd never ridden before and got rid of it 6 months later. He just couldn't get comfortable trying to learn to ride on a bike that big. Never could get confident with it. He's done with bikes now, no desire to get another one.

Small bikes are way easier to learn on, and unlike what some people say, even small bikes are fun to ride. Phone Post 3.0

I started on a ultra classic, but I took the two day class first. Get what you want and watch out for the cages.

883 is a great starter bike. Do it.

How big are you?

KGB4HD - 883 is a great starter bike. Do it.

How big are you?
6ft and 200lbs Phone Post 3.0

Retired Blue Belt - 
KGB4HD - 883 is a great starter bike. Do it.

How big are you?
6ft and 200lbs Phone Post 3.0

Too big for what a lot of guys are suggesting. If it wasn't a starter bike, I'd say you're probably too big for a sportster but for your size and current skillset, it's ideal. In a couple of years, upgrade to a Street Bob if you like bobbers.

Having said that, if you were my buddy & 31 with no experience, I would coach against getting a street bike. Shit will hit the fan, on a regular basis, and it's the instant reaction that will be the difference escape & collision. I'd coach to start offroad (trails, etc., not motocross) because the risks are so much lower. No asphalt, no cars, no cross-traffic; learn the skill set, fine-tune reactions, etc. You might break bones, but it would take an effort to kill yourself. Not so on the street.

I grew up on dirt bikes, then Enduros (street legal dirtbike), then bought my first Harely at 19. Been riding almost 40 years, and it still scares me enough to be damn wary.

KGB4HD -
Retired Blue Belt - 
KGB4HD - 883 is a great starter bike. Do it.

How big are you?
6ft and 200lbs Phone Post 3.0

Too big for what a lot of guys are suggesting. If it wasn't a starter bike, I'd say you're probably too big for a sportster but for your size and current skillset, it's ideal. In a couple of years, upgrade to a Street Bob if you like bobbers.

Having said that, if you were my buddy & 31 with no experience, I would coach against getting a street bike. Shit will hit the fan, on a regular basis, and it's the instant reaction that will be the difference escape & collision. I'd coach to start offroad (trails, etc., not motocross) because the risks are so much lower. No asphalt, no cars, no cross-traffic; learn the skill set, fine-tune reactions, etc. You might break bones, but it would take an effort to kill yourself. Not so on the street.

I grew up on dirt bikes, then Enduros (street legal dirtbike), then bought my first Harely at 19. Been riding almost 40 years, and it still scares me enough to be damn wary.
Thanks for the input, what's so bad about the Iron 883 in the event of "shit hits the fan on the regular"? Phone Post 3.0

Also, my brother in law is more than willing to take me to a parking lot to learn on sport bike. He's been pushing it for a while now, he says his bike is really easy to ride for being a crotch rocket. Phone Post 3.0

Retired Blue Belt -
RATFINK13 - Have you ridden in the past? Phone Post 3.0
Absolutely not, just grown up around the culture. My parents have two bikes. Phone Post 3.0
Buy one of the new crop of 300 cc bikes.
Learn how to ride it before the Haley thing.
Good luck Phone Post 3.0

I did the same thing, bought a denim 883 as my first bike. 9 months later I upgraded to a Street Bob.

I don't know how big you are, but sportsters start to feel pretty small, especially on the highway. I'm 5'10", 170 and the Street Bob feels waaaaay better.

And you can get it in denim. Phone Post 3.0

Ah, 6'1, 200... yeah, it'll feel tiny.

And if you have the $$$ and are confident you're going to like riding, go for the Harley. My bike is considerably newer and nicer than my car and I have no regrets. Phone Post 3.0

You might want to get a motorcycle that doesn't suck. Most other motorcycle companies feel the need to update their technology every year, Harley get's by on image.

I just sold my 1st bike, a 2005 Honda Shadow 750,

Can't imagine a better bike to learn on and they can be had for around $2,000.

Good way to learn and not too expensive.

slagathor -
Kubla khan - Buy something used, small, and cheap. Ride it until you are competent then sell it and buy the Harley. If you lose a couple hundred on the starter bike it's still a lot cheaper than fixing the Harley when you drop it. Phone Post 3.0

A good starter bike is worth its weight in gold, the biggest thing to become a good competent rider is confidence. If you have half a brain you will not be confident for quite some time on the road.

Take the MSF class, tons of knowledge and experience you can gain from them, on top of an insurance discount.

Eyes open constantly, in the 3 years I've been on a bike I've almost been smashed by someone not paying attention no less than 30 times, and my most recent bike was a very loud bright orange Repsol CBR sport bike, so not exactly subdued , most of the time in traffic, and someone either doesn't see me and tries to merge, pulls out in front, or almost rear ends me and doesn't brake.

Dress for the fall, not the ride. No one wants bacon skin.

Any other questions PM me
You have been hit 30 times in three years? Phone Post 3.0

RATFINK13 - Some good advice here. I too like the 883, and while I agree they look cool, don't let that decide what you buy imo.
Since you are a new rider, the likely hood of you at the very least dropping the bike is high.
I would recommend getting something small, 500-600cc. Get the feel of riding, take the course, ride for a year or longer, then move to the bigger "cooler" bikes. Just my 2 cents. Phone Post 3.0
VU. First bike I had was a triumph bobber, dumped it a fee times , then bought a 1200 sportster roadster. Dumped it once, not bad. I don't suggest buying a nice bike for your first bike or a crotch rocket buy one from one of your buddies or build yourself a rat bike first Phone Post 3.0