Timeline of the universe

This stuff fascinates me, so i thought i'd share. I know it came up before in a thread but it's burried deep.

 

Link because it turned out smaller than i figured:

 

http://www.bbc.com/future/bespoke/20140107-far-future/assets/images/far-future-timeline-v2.png

I think they are off by 5yrs or so on a couple of things Phone Post 3.0

I always thought the universe would be bigger.

Sub Phone Post 3.0

No single present day word survives in 1000 years due to rapid evolution of language?

That's puzzling.

Very cool. Vu Phone Post 3.0

Alco Hauler - 


No single present day word survives in 1000 years due to rapid evolution of language?



That's puzzling.



Yet not really surprising considering the way it already has evolved in the past 1000 years. And it seems to be evolving faster and faster in this high tech era.

Darth Ryase -


I always thought the universe would be bigger.

Yeah that Neil DeGrasse Tyson is full of shit Phone Post 3.0

Sub Phone Post 3.0

Nalaan - 
Alco Hauler - 

No single present day word survives in 1000 years due to rapid evolution of language?

That's puzzling.


Yet not really surprising considering the way it already has evolved in the past 1000 years. And it seems to be evolving faster and faster in this high tech era.

 

Researchers in Britain have identified twenty-three words from a postulated “proto-Eurasiatic” language spoken before the end of the last Ice Age. (15,000 years)

 

The words (common to at least four of seven Eurasiatic language families) are: Thou, I, Not, That, We, To give, Who, This, What, Man/male, Ye, Old, Mother, To hear, Hand, Fire, To pull, Black, To flow, Bark, Ashes, To spit, and Worm.

 

I get that language evolves, but to have ZERO words survive in 1000 years doesn't sound right.

I could have sworn I read in Lawrence Krauss' A Universe From Nothing that the expected age of the universe was only two trillion years.  100 quintillion years seems a bit off lol.

. Phone Post 3.0

Alco Hauler -
Nalaan - 
Alco Hauler - 

No single present day word survives in 1000 years due to rapid evolution of language?

That's puzzling.


Yet not really surprising considering the way it already has evolved in the past 1000 years. And it seems to be evolving faster and faster in this high tech era.

 

Researchers in Britain have identified twenty-three words from a postulated “proto-Eurasiatic” language spoken before the end of the last Ice Age. (15,000 years)

 

The words (common to at least four of seven Eurasiatic language families) are: Thou, I, Not, That, We, To give, Who, This, What, Man/male, Ye, Old, Mother, To hear, Hand, Fire, To pull, Black, To flow, Bark, Ashes, To spit, and Worm.

 


I get that language evolves, but to have ZERO words survive in 1000 years doesn't sound right.

Yeah. In with you on this. Phone Post 3.0

Soup and Beer - 


I could have sworn I read in Lawrence Krauss' A Universe From Nothing that the expected age of the universe was only two trillion years.  100 quintillion years seems a bit off lol.



I think that is people that subscribe to the Big Crunch theory.  That eventually the Universe will hit a recoil point and return to it's singularity form.  Most now go by the Big Cool theory, which is basically the Universe will expand until it runs out of fuel.  I've seen some pretty cool mockups of that, including things like basically empty night skies.  Because as the Universe expands, the galaxies get further and further away from each other, eventually the only stars in the night sky would be the other ones in the Milky Way.  Although I don't think anyone needs to really worry about that for a long, long, long time.

Vu op. Love this shit Phone Post 3.0

Soup and Beer - 


I could have sworn I read in Lawrence Krauss' A Universe From Nothing that the expected age of the universe was only two trillion years.  100 quintillion years seems a bit off lol.


I think 2 trillion years is, in fact, an important milestone but I've read it's actually the point at which light from galaxies outside our local group becomes so red shifted that it can't be seen anymore.

That is to say, anything living in the 20 or so galaxies around or own, will have no way of knowing whether or not anything in the universe exists outside their own 20 galaxies.

Glovegate - 
Soup and Beer - 

I could have sworn I read in Lawrence Krauss' A Universe From Nothing that the expected age of the universe was only two trillion years.  100 quintillion years seems a bit off lol.

<br />
<span class="User-300581" id="userPost54032140">I think 2 trillion years is, in fact, an important milestone but I've read it's actually the point at which light from galaxies outside our local group becomes so red shifted that it can't be seen anymore.<br />
<br />
That is to say, anything living in the 20 or so galaxies around or own, will have no way of knowing whether or not anything in the universe exists outside their own 20 galaxies.</span></blockquote>

 

IIRC, in Krauss' book, two trillion years is the point at which the fabric of space is expanding so quickly that matter at the subatomic level literally rips itself apart.  But this must be assuming a flat universe with an exponentially increasing expansion rate.  100 quadtrillion years must be removing the effects of dark energy with a constant expansion rate.