Tips for winter preparation?

Up to this point, I've lived my entire life in and around the Seattle area.  Winter there just means rain and darkness -- while it's not always a ton of fun, it's not particularly difficult either.  This summer, however, brought a big move for me and my wife, and we now live in southeastern Minnesota.  While the weather is actually perfectly pleasant right now, there's a chill in the air and the setting realization that we are just not ready for 5 months of sub-freezing temperatures and endless snow. 

Also, this is the first house we've ever owned, so winterization is something new for me.  It's a slightly older house (built 1951) on a ~1 acre wooded lot.  Natural gas runs a boiler in the basement for heat, and we're well stocked with firewood, for what it's worth.

I figure there's a wide range of experiences here, so I'm asking for any tips/advice from any of you snow-hardened posters out there, both in terms of the practical home winterizing stuff as well as just personal advice to avoid losing my mind during the impending freeze.

If you've lived your whole life in an area with harsh winters, things that might seem obvious to you are likely novel concepts to me, so literally anything helps.  Thanks!

Do you miss Seattle?

OMC 6000 - Do you miss Seattle?


I love that we're living in a house that we would never be able to afford in Seattle, but other than that I miss it like crazy.  We've been here almost 4 months and at least once a day I think of something I'd like to do or someone I'd like to see and then get bummed out when I realize that it's back home.

Get appropriate winter clothing. Waterproof down parka with hood. Good insulated, waterproof boots, with decent trend for slippery surfaces. Wool socks and long underwear for really cold days. A good set of gloves and mittens. Gear up like you're a winter model from a Filson or L.L. Bean catalog (or REI if you want to look "sporty").

You can put that 3M plastic stuff on your windows for added insulation. Have emergency supplies (e.g., canned food, candles, water, batteries, crank radio) ready for any potential blackouts or when the Governor calls for a travel ban due to snow. Don't let your pipes freeze.

Get your car checked before winter hits. Winter tires are a good option. Store emergency supplies (like what's listed above), along with a blanket, a shovel, salt, and cardboard (for under your tires for traction if stuck) in your vehicle as well. If you've got an AWD or 4WD vehicle, that's good. If you have FWD you'll be OK too. If you have a RWD, drive smart and add some weight to the back, like some sand bags or cinder blocks.

For fun, get some snowshoes for you and the wife, and go hiking. If you've got money, a ski trip is fun. Go get a toboggan (or the lid of plastic garbage can or cardboard) and go sledding on your local hill. Take up ice climbing. Bring some hot toddy to warm you up during the fun.

Lol @ needing tips on how to stay warm!!


How old are you? Four?!

Ha ha ha ha ha ha!!!!! Phone Post 3.0

Do not cheap out on boots and your winter coat. Keep extra gloves, hat, and scarves in your car. Phone Post 3.0

tips on how to shovel.

I feel Im in good shape, but fuck, shoveling is tough work

case of jack, case of jim,

itswhitty -
OMC 6000 - Do you miss Seattle?


I love that we're living in a house that we would never be able to afford in Seattle, but other than that I miss it like crazy.  We've been here almost 4 months and at least once a day I think of something I'd like to do or someone I'd like to see and then get bummed out when I realize that it's back home.

I left 7 years ago and this still happens to me bro. I visited last month and kept thinking I was driving home. When it dawned on me that I wasn't on my way home I was crushed. I miss that damn city. Hopefully you do better than I have. Phone Post 3.0

Eat loads of ice pops 

Angle 5 - Get appropriate winter clothing. Waterproof down parka with hood. Good insulated, waterproof boots, with decent trend for slippery surfaces. Wool socks and long underwear for really cold days. A good set of gloves and mittens. Gear up like you're a winter model from a Filson or L.L. Bean catalog (or REI if you want to look "sporty").

You can put that 3M plastic stuff on your windows for added insulation. Have emergency supplies (e.g., canned food, candles, water, batteries, crank radio) ready for any potential blackouts or when the Governor calls for a travel ban due to snow. Don't let your pipes freeze.

Get your car checked before winter hits. Winter tires are a good option. Store emergency supplies (like what's listed above), along with a blanket, a shovel, salt, and cardboard (for under your tires for traction if stuck) in your vehicle as well. If you've got an AWD or 4WD vehicle, that's good. If you have FWD you'll be OK too. If you have a RWD, drive smart and add some weight to the back, like some sand bags or cinder blocks.

For fun, get some snowshoes for you and the wife, and go hiking. If you've got money, a ski trip is fun. Go get a toboggan (or the lid of plastic garbage can or cardboard) and go sledding on your local hill. Take up ice climbing. Bring some hot toddy to warm you up during the fun.
Excellent advice. Only other thing I can think of is if you have the money buy a generator. I live in upstate NY, we get pounded with lake effect snow. Phone Post 3.0

Here in Houston we just turn our ceiling fans off. Good to go.