Turning in the Clinch!

ttt

thanks!

Anything you would like to add?

Yours,
Beev

Okay, there is always alot of talk about clinching on here. I have been doing alot of clinching tonight in my workout. We specifically trained on turning and off balancing your oppnent. Its a brilliant technique that is easy to pull off and can be used with equal effectiveness as an ofensive or defensive technique. Its one of my favourite set ups for a knee from the clinch.

So I thought Id do a bit of an instructional thread on it. Enjoy.

Turning and off balancing your opponent is a simple and yet vital skill. You will be surprised at what a simple turn can do. It can set up just about any technique within the clinch and is also a very strong defensive technique too.

When I am in the clinch and my opponent has the basic neck control, I often hook one forearm, pinning it to my chest and then cup the back of my opponents head with my other hand. Like the basic Collar and Elbow. Then I simply monitor my opponents movements and then feel his energy. You will be surprised at how when you clinch you are aware of your opponents slightest movements.

Cont...

If, for example I have control of my opponents right forearm pinned to my chest with my left hand, and my right hand on the back of his head. From that position, if my opponent throws a right knee, I pull him to the left. If he throws a left knee, I pull him to the right. Pulling him away from his knee immediately nullifies any power he has in that knee and alos prevents him from coming up with any kind of follow up.

From that point, his main concern is regaining his balance before I can capitalise. To put it bluntly, he's in trouble, he vulnerable.

So, now I have talked a bit about how turning your opponent is used, I will explain how the turn is actually executed.

To begin with, you want to make sure that you have a good, tight grip on one of your opponents arms or his head. The next thing is where do you wan to go? Do you want to turn him to the left or right? Whichever way you turn him, always make sure that you step in the opposite direction with the opposite leg.

For example, if I want to turn my opponent to the left, then I want to step right with my right foot. Then I tug as hard as is necessary with my left arm on either his arm or his head, whichever I have control of. Now, from here, I want to spin my left leg back as I pull him. This turns my opponent the way I want him to go with out negating my balance in any way. As far as the footwork goes, it is very much like switching guard while in the clinch.

So, to reiterate, I am in the clinch and my opponent is throwing a knee to my left side. To counter I want to turn him to my right side. So the first thing I do is take step with my left foot, (yes, I am stepping towards his knee) and at the same time I want to turn pull him by his arm or head to my right. As soon as I start to pull him to my right, I should have completed the step with my left foot and am now starting to pull my right foot back. So, the momentum of my weight suddenly shifting to the right side when I am controlling him and the velocity of his knee travelling in the opposite direction that I am pulling him will greatly hinder his balance.

So, now I have turned him on his knee and he is trying to regain balance. Now is the PERFECT opportunity for me to throw a right knee to his body. He is too busy trying to regain his composure that he cant react to the knee. There ar a couple of other grips you can use when you want to turn your opponent. You could do it from the Basic neck control, the outside control and just about any other tie up that you can think of. The important thing is to have a rock solid grip on one part of his upper body. Whether its his arm, head or neck.

Hope you guys find this info useful!

Yours,
Beev

nice post beev.

Ryan

ttt

The British Khun Kao!

Nice post Beev.

Cheers

Andy

Bollard,
Where you at Master A's show last sunday at Middleton?

A couple of fighters from ym gym were fighting on that card.

Yours,
Beev

No, I've not been training for 3-4 weeks due to holiday and work commitments, so I've lost touch with visits to fights. I don't think any of our fighters were competing
How did your lads get on?

Cheers

Andy

One of them was Cat Steele, my Coach's wife (shes from Thailand). She sdaly lost in the second round through stoppage. The other guy, Dave Barlow, won his fight but it went the distance.

Yours,
Beev