Two facts about death I never knew.

Pardon me a moment, please...ahem!...


AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAARRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Ah, thank you.

"Coffin Birth" screen name in 5,4,3,..

Rtchamp15 -
Right Hand JO Power - I hope i poop in my pants when i die. Phone Post

I hope you poop in my pants when I die. Phone Post

I hope I die when you poop in his pants Phone Post

mige - subbed to the podcast, I've been looking for a new one. Voted up!

It's my favorite Podcast. The two guys that host it (Josh and Chuck) work well together, awesome random OG type facts, good humor thrown in, etc... they had one on how a body farm works if you're interested in that. It was from last year so you will have to go back a ways to find it.

That's gnarly shit dog... Phone Post 3.0

@ Phone Post 3.0

WTF is a body farm!? Phone Post 3.0

felix1985 - WTF is a body farm!? Phone Post 3.0

Acres of land with dead bodies all over it so scientists and doctors can study how bodies decompose under different conditions. Phone Post

Rtchamp15 -
felix1985 - WTF is a body farm!? Phone Post 3.0

Acres of land with dead bodies all over it so scientists and doctors can study how bodies decompose under different conditions. Phone Post

The fuck!? Phone Post 3.0

cwcoogan - 
Right Hand JO Power - 

I hope i poop in my pants when i die. Phone Post


Why wait?

have a shnitters

In Phone Post 3.0

makes sense. your lacrimal gland produces your tears.

felix1985 -
Rtchamp15 -
felix1985 - WTF is a body farm!? Phone Post 3.0

Acres of land with dead bodies all over it so scientists and doctors can study how bodies decompose under different conditions. Phone Post

The fuck!? Phone Post 3.0

I'm thinking about starting my own. Phone Post

Lmao @ "if he cant shit he can walk". Phone Post

viorage - I read somewhere that humans cannot very with tears until after six months or something like that Phone Post
My 4 month old disagrees. Phone Post 3.0

#1 is not true

 

ive seen my fair share of dead bodies and been present AT moment of death

Phone Post 3.0

n2bateyou - I've seen quite a few people die and I'll this you this. There is no 'always' or 'never'


And most people don't shed a single tear out of either eye. That's romanticized bullshit. The ones that know they are going to die are generally too scared to cry. Not always. But often.

As your body starts to shut down in the dying process, fluid is shunted to vital organs. Tears are generally in short supply.

And yes, sometimes the body will void bladder and/or bowels. But it's not as common as you might think. Phone Post 3.0


Most helpful serial killer ever. Thank you Sir.



 



p.s.  Pls don't kill us in our sleep.

A body farm is a research facility where human decomposition can be studied in a variety of settings. The aim is to gain a better understanding of the decomposition process, permitting the development of techniques for extracting information (such as the timing and circumstances of death) from human remains. Body farm research is particularly important within forensic anthropology and related disciplines, and has applications in the fields of law enforcement and forensic science. Four such facilities exist in the United States, with the research facility operated by Texas State University at Freeman Ranch being the largest at seven acres.

University of Tennessee at Knoxville

The original "Body Farm" is the University of Tennessee Anthropological Research Facility located a few miles from downtown on Alcoa Highway in Knoxville, Tennessee, behind the University of Tennessee Medical Center. It was first started in late 1981 by anthropologist Dr. William M. Bass as a facility for study of the decomposition of human remains. Dr. Bass became head of the university's anthropology department in 1971, and as official state forensic anthropologist for Tennessee he was frequently consulted in police cases involving decomposed human remains. Since no facilities existed that specifically studied decomposition, in 1981 he opened the department's first body farm.[1]

It consists of a 2.5-acre (10,000 m2) wooded plot, surrounded by a razor wire fence. At any one time there will be a number of bodies placed in different settings throughout the facility and left to decompose. The bodies are exposed in a number of ways in order to provide insights into decomposition under varying conditions. Detailed observations and records of the decomposition process are kept, including the sequence and speed of decomposition and the effects of insect activity.

Over 100 bodies are donated to the facility every year. Some individuals pre-register before their death, and others are donated by their families or by a medical examiner. 60% of donations are made by family members of individuals who were not pre-registered with the facility. Over 1300 people have chosen to pre-register themselves.[2] Perhaps the most famous person to donate his body for study was the anthropologist Grover Krantz, as described by his colleague David Hunt at the Smithsonian.[3]

The University of Tennessee Body Farm is also used in the training of law enforcement officers in scene-of-crime skills and techniques.[4]