unlimited energy supplyout of anything

so anything living pretty much draws an unlimited power supply out of the sun, and minerals in the earth. Why aren't we figuring out how this works and using it for energy?

If I can turn a bowl of fruit loops and some water into 8 hours of ditch digging, why cant we apply this process to some robots or something?

accident.

Because life is way more complex than a stupid robot.

 

Shits gonna get real in the next decade.  WE're advancing way to fast for our own good.

Mother nature has been perfecting her shit for millions of years Phone Post

Ghost of Retard -


Because life is way more complex than a stupid robot.



 



Shits gonna get real in the next decade.  WE're advancing way to fast for our own good.

This. We're too smart yet too stupid. Phone Post 3.0

cheesyfries -
Ghost of Retard -


Because life is way more complex than a stupid robot.



 



Shits gonna get real in the next decade.  WE're advancing way to fast for our own good.

This. We're too smart yet too stupid. Phone Post 3.0
Too reckless with new technology. People want to live forever, so the ones with the means will try to make it happen.

I'm good with dying at some point. Phone Post 3.0

Ghost of Retard -


Because life is way more complex than a stupid robot.



 



Shits gonna get real in the next decade.  WE're advancing way to fast for our own good.

This.

Look up the Kardashev scale.

At some point we'll advance to the next type of civilization if we don't kill everybody first. Phone Post 3.0

Mihow - the whole 'advancing too fast' is bullshit sci-fi story nonsense
Michio kaku, arguably one of the smartest dudes on the planet, said in his book Hyperspace that we may become the next type of civilization on the Kardashev scale if we didn't destroy ourselves in the process.

No offense, but I think he is a little more knowledgable on the subject than you. Phone Post 3.0

All the energy stored in Earth's reserves of coal, oil, and natural gas is matched by the energy from just 20 days of sunshine. Outside Earth's atmosphere, the sun's energy contains about 1,300 watts per square meter. About one-third of this light is reflected back into space, and some is absorbed by the atmosphere (in part causing winds to blow).

By the time it reaches Earth's surface, the energy in sunlight has fallen to about 1,000 watts per square meter at noon on a cloudless day. Averaged over the entire surface of the planet, 24 hours per day for a year, each square meter collects the approximate energy equivalent of almost a barrel of oil each year, or 4.2 kilowatt-hours of energy every day.


http://solar.gwu.edu/FAQ/solar_potential.html

edited double post