Utilitarianism

...what men try to do is to attain the greatest possible happiness for themselves. Happiness is here taken to mean the same as pleasure. The function of the law is to ensure that, in seeking his own maximum pleasure, nobody should impair this same pursuit for others. In this way is achieved the greatest happiness of the greatest number. . . utilitarianism has certainly achieved more than all the idealist philosophies put together. . . Two great conclusions follow from the utilitarian ethic. First it seems clear that in some respects all men have equally strong urges towards happiness. Therefore they should all enjoy equal rights and opportunities. This view was somewhat of a novelty at the time, and constituted one of the central tenets of the reforming programme of the radicals.

The other inference that suggests itself is that the greatest happiness can only be attained if conditions remain stable. Thus, equality and security are overriding considerations.

"First it seems clear that in some respects all men have equally strong urges towards happiness."

Why? And how does that follow from utilitarianism?

I disagree as well. I just wanted something relating to utilitarism to throw up there. Some people seem to want to be happy, while others don't care, or seem not to care. Example: people who victimize themselves, or take part in destructive activities.