Want to buy a motorcycle. TMA

I am thinking about taking a class to get a motorcycle license and then buying a motorcycle. I am pretty clueless on a lot of this motorcycle stuff so tell me anything. 

I wanna do this because motorcycles are fun and girls like guys with motorcycles. I would want a sports type of bike instead of a Harley style of bike. I'm not one of those idiots that would want to ride it 100 mph down some streets so I don't need it to be too fast. What type of bikes should I look into? What types of helmets and gear should I look into buying as well? Thank you. 

I've been riding for 30 years. My advice is to get an old, cheap, relatively small Japanese bike to learn on. You should be able to find a 1980s 400-600cc bike for $500-$800, depending on the condition. This will be small enough to learn on easily, cheap enough to drop a few times without crying, and still plenty fast enough to thrill you or kill you. In a few years, you'll want to move to something bigger, nicer, or both, but at that time, you'll be enough of a rider to know what really feels good to you on a test drive.

Personally, I still like the small-to-mid bikes. I don't ride distances or race, so 550cc is still doing me fine. 

Willybone -


I've been riding for 30 years. My advice is to get an old, cheap, relatively small Japanese bike to learn on. You should be able to find a 1980s 400-600cc bike for $500-$800, depending on the condition. This will be small enough to learn on easily, cheap enough to drop a few times without crying, and still plenty fast enough to thrill you or kill you. In a few years, you'll want to move to something bigger, nicer, or both, but at that time, you'll be enough of a rider to know what really feels good to you on a test drive.



Personally, I still like the small-to-mid bikes. I don't ride distances or race, so 550cc is still doing me fine. 



Thanks! That's exactly the type of bike I'm looking for. Looks cool too. Any recommendations as far as brands?

Willybone - 


I've been riding for 30 years. My advice is to get an old, cheap, relatively small Japanese bike to learn on. You should be able to find a 1980s 400-600cc bike for $500-$800, depending on the condition. This will be small enough to learn on easily, cheap enough to drop a few times without crying, and still plenty fast enough to thrill you or kill you. In a few years, you'll want to move to something bigger, nicer, or both, but at that time, you'll be enough of a rider to know what really feels good to you on a test drive.



Personally, I still like the small-to-mid bikes. I don't ride distances or race, so 550cc is still doing me fine. 




This motherfucker nailed it.

Not only will you save a few bucks (and potentially your life) but you can ABSOLUTELY make those 80's - 90's "average bikes look cool.

I rode a Yamaha Virago (cruiser) in the early 90's and sold it when I had kids. When I start riding again when the kids are gone I'm going to go small (750cc and under) and old/retro.

Willybone -


I've been riding for 30 years. My advice is to get an old, cheap, relatively small Japanese bike to learn on. You should be able to find a 1980s 400-600cc bike for $500-$800, depending on the condition. This will be small enough to learn on easily, cheap enough to drop a few times without crying, and still plenty fast enough to thrill you or kill you. In a few years, you'll want to move to something bigger, nicer, or both, but at that time, you'll be enough of a rider to know what really feels good to you on a test drive.



Personally, I still like the small-to-mid bikes. I don't ride distances or race, so 550cc is still doing me fine. 



First post first post nailed it. Can't get better advise than this. When I was younger and decided to start riding, I thought I wanted a sport bike too. After I started riding cruisers, I never looked back. 

 

It's better to underestimate your riding skill than to overestimate. Start small. 

Harley just came out with a new sports type bike. It's all black with red shocks, I can't remember the name but I think it looks pretty badass. 

Start on trails, not the road.  You'll develop good reactions while dealing with the unexpected and dirt hurts less than asphalt. And it's fun a fuck.

^great idea

More fun to ride a slow bike fast than a fast bike slow.

Just don't go too old. Parts get discontinued a lot on 80s models.

That said, can't go wrong with Yamaha and Honda.

By a used Suzuki sv650.  Ride it a year and find what you like about it and don't like about it. 

 

Sell it for almost what you payed for it and get something to keep.

Dress for the fall, not the ride.

Kubla khan -

By a used Suzuki sv650.  Ride it a year and find what you like about it and don't like about it. 

 

Sell it for almost what you payed for it and get something to keep.

 Came to post this 

 

V twin on this is very forgiving , excellent engine braking and enough grunt to make you smile .

 

This plus a million 

On a positive note, learning to ride a bike isn't that hard and it's fun. There's nothing better than being on a bike in great weather.

Willybone -


I've been riding for 30 years. My advice is to get an old, cheap, relatively small Japanese bike to learn on. You should be able to find a 1980s 400-600cc bike for $500-$800, depending on the condition. This will be small enough to learn on easily, cheap enough to drop a few times without crying, and still plenty fast enough to thrill you or kill you. In a few years, you'll want to move to something bigger, nicer, or both, but at that time, you'll be enough of a rider to know what really feels good to you on a test drive.



Personally, I still like the small-to-mid bikes. I don't ride distances or race, so 550cc is still doing me fine. 



Best post you will see on the matter.
The usual guys will turn up say no go big you will out grow it in 3 weeks which is crap!!
Get a solid old cheaper bike and enjoy.

the_b00ts - 
the_b00ts -
LiveWire -

Harley just came out with a new sports type bike. It's all black with red shocks, I can't remember the name but I think it looks pretty badass. 

Street Rod 750

 

This is what I'm looking at getting. Maybe, hopefully....

 


The new Rebel 500 has more horsepower than an Iron 883.

screw all that if you are learning you need something that you will feel more familiar with. You been driving cars and or trucks to this point right?

In that case you need to start with a Boss Hoss.

lol
I was gonna say Valkyrie

Helmet: get a decent brand, but not a race replica model. You want quality without paying for Valentino Rossi's yacht. It needs to be tight on your face but comfortable around the ears and skull. The cheek pads will get softer but it can't give you a headache.

 

It should also be quiet, which is hard to check but usually anything poking out of the helmet will make noise if you're going fast. It doesn't seem like a big deal but riding for hours listening to your helmet go EEEEEEEEEEEEE is not enjoyable or good for your hearing.

Gear is a personal thing but you have to be clear on what you will do on the bike.

 

Just sports riding: get the best quality armoured leather you can afford, with a back protector and riding boots/shoes. Some small places will do custom gear that's actually cheaper than Dainese type premium brands. 

 

Commuting all year or adventure riding: decent quality armoured textile pants and jacket, probably a summer jacket and a winter one. Good ventilation for summer, waterproof and warm in winter. 

 

A mix of riding for fun and transport: a good jacket (textile or leather), lined jeans, solid boots you can walk in. You'll sacrifice protection a bit but it's no good showing up for a date or whatever in boots you can hardly walk in and so much gear you can't move without squeaking.

^speaking of falling off bikes, gloves with a palm slider or at least a reinforced palm are a good idea. I came off on gravel with no gloves once, skinned palms are no fun especially if you're in the middle of nowhere and need to ride another 300km that day.