What is "Osss"?

what does it mean?

It is truth. It is light. It is the way.

What isn't osss Phone Post 3.0

I think it's supposed to be "osu,' and it came from kyokushin karate, IIRC.

It is a shortened version of the chant used as the path to enlightenment. When meditating, novitiates of the Shendokan are taught to find their own inner Shen by chanting "O-shen-shen"

However, when not in a deep meditative state, they remind themselves of this deeper principle by simply using the shorted "O-S-S" or "Oss" instead of the full "O-Shen-shen".

It's actually OATS!!! So often mispronounced. Granola and oats is the way to go. Phone Post 3.0

Lol Phone Post 3.0

ColeMillerATT - It's actually OATS!!! So often mispronounced. Granola and oats is the way to go. Phone Post 3.0
I should be coming down to your fight this weekend. Phone Post 3.0

FlowWithTheGo -
ColeMillerATT - It's actually OATS!!! So often mispronounced. Granola and oats is the way to go. Phone Post 3.0
I should be coming down to your fight this weekend. Phone Post 3.0
Good luck and kick some ass. Phone Post 3.0

Funny stuff above.

My own anecdotal take on it after 21 years is as follows:

The Gracie family/Rio jiu jitsu guys (in general) were not all that into judo/Japanese culture.

Once jiu jitsu really spread to Sao Paulo--this happened in earnest post-UFC 1--you had alot more judo guys converting over to jiu jitsu. They brought with them some of the formality of Japanese culture.

When I began we called our instructors by their first names and hugged. Now many schools call their instructors "Professor" and bow to them--once they have been given permission to come onto the mat if they arrive a minute late.

"Osss" or "Osu" is a part of this and really only became prevalent once so many Sao Paulo/non-Rio athletes started winning world championships.

I still remember when Fabio Gurgel (and Ryan Gracie) went to Sao Paulo. All the dudes in Rio thought they were crazy. Fast forward several years and you have tons of Alliance SP and their offshoots dominating. Etc. Ossss!

For the record, I hate Osss!

Yeah, none of the Helio and Carlos lines said anything like that in the 1990s in Brazil. No bowing, no oss, no titles like "professor". Royler was just "Royler", etc.

Relson gets visibly bothered by that type of jock-riding, and from what I've heard Carlson was the same way.

Pretty much true with what John frankl said in regards to bjj culture in Oz as well.

It's a recent phenomena. Probably started here around 10 years ago was when I noticed a few sprinklings of the usage.

Can't stand it and can't stand professor either

John Frankl - Funny stuff above.

My own anecdotal take on it after 21 years is as follows:

The Gracie family/Rio jiu jitsu guys (in general) were not all that into judo/Japanese culture.

Once jiu jitsu really spread to Sao Paulo--this happened in earnest post-UFC 1--you had alot more judo guys converting over to jiu jitsu. They brought with them some of the formality of Japanese culture.

When I began we called our instructors by their first names and hugged. Now many schools call their instructors "Professor" and bow to them--once they have been given permission to come onto the mat if they arrive a minute late.

"Osss" or "Osu" is a part of this and really only became prevalent once so many Sao Paulo/non-Rio athletes started winning world championships.

I still remember when Fabio Gurgel (and Ryan Gracie) went to Sao Paulo. All the dudes in Rio thought they were crazy. Fast forward several years and you have tons of Alliance SP and their offshoots dominating. Etc. Ossss!

For the record, I hate Osss!


This ^^^



I started 25 years ago and never heard that in Jiu Jitsu once. Never bowed in class, never lined up in belt order and instructors (Relson) were called by their first names. I called GM Helio Profesor because I wasn't gonna call him by his first name. Asked Carlson Sr. what do I call you? He said Carlson. I stuck with Master.



I like the respect shown and taken from the bowing we see today. It's not a requirement for my students. I think the word is overused and has lost its real meaning. My class is a SSO FREE ZONE.



For the record, I really hate sso backwards so much I don't even want to spell it out.



 

Professor in BJJ is not a title; it is just the Portuguese word for teacher. Just like in Japanese it is Sensei (or Sifu in Chinese). I think it would actually be more respectful calling sir. It is the crazy Japanophile westerners nerds that made a big deal of etiquette and hierarchy in TMA putting the teacher’s in pedestals, and the teacher with ego issues creating grandmaster titles.

http://www.tofugu.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/so-japanese.jpg

John Frankl - Funny stuff above.

My own anecdotal take on it after 21 years is as follows:

The Gracie family/Rio jiu jitsu guys (in general) were not all that into judo/Japanese culture.

Once jiu jitsu really spread to Sao Paulo--this happened in earnest post-UFC 1--you had alot more judo guys converting over to jiu jitsu. They brought with them some of the formality of Japanese culture.

When I began we called our instructors by their first names and hugged. Now many schools call their instructors "Professor" and bow to them--once they have been given permission to come onto the mat if they arrive a minute late.

"Osss" or "Osu" is a part of this and really only became prevalent once so many Sao Paulo/non-Rio athletes started winning world championships.

I still remember when Fabio Gurgel (and Ryan Gracie) went to Sao Paulo. All the dudes in Rio thought they were crazy. Fast forward several years and you have tons of Alliance SP and their offshoots dominating. Etc. Ossss!

For the record, I hate Osss!

thank you for the lesson sensei! you have taken time to answer my question when few others would! osss

Osu (or osss or however you want to spell it if you do not like the Japanese) is a japanese term. It comes to BJJ from Judo, and to kickboxing from dutch kickboxing which has strong roots in karate (mostly kyokushin).

It is technically not a real word in japanese. It comes from the custom of shortening phrases into a "short version" abbreviation because the whole phrase is too cumbersome.

It may have a bit different meaning depending on who you ask. basically it is a abbreviation of either Oshi Shinobu, Onegai Shimasu, or Ohayo Gozaimasu.

Oshi shinobu means "persevering when pushed". this meaning comes from kyokushin and is seldom seen outside styles related to kyokushin. Basically it is a encouragement and reminder to not give up when the going gets hard.

Onegai Shimasu -means "please" or "if you please". Osu used as an abbreviation of this is a affirmative or an acknowledging reply.

Ohayo gozaimasu -this abbreviation originates in the Japanese navy, and basically meant "good morning". Osu used in this way is a general greeting.
 
Basically Osu is used as a catch-all phrase, especially outside of Japan.
 
In japan the use of the term "osu" is common in gyms, sports, martial arts (maily full contact ones) and in bikergangs and among kids trying to sound tough. Basically anywhere that you can find a lot of testosterone and Machismo.
It is not a term that you will find used in polite society Japan. Many martial art dojos are trying to remove it as it is seen as rude and impolite. Dont use  it outside of a dojo (and maybe not even there) unless you know what you are doing.

Oxe!

So much LARP.

The Mat Pimp - Yeah, none of the Helio and Carlos lines said anything like that in the 1990s in Brazil. No bowing, no oss, no titles like "professor". Royler was just "Royler", etc.

Relson gets visibly bothered by that type of jock-riding, and from what I've heard Carlson was the same way.


This may be mostly true, but Carlson's black belt Marcelo Alonso was lining students up and bowing (and saying osu!) when I visited in 2000.



But then, I think it came from his judo days (with George Medhi). He may just like a little more formality than a lot of guys -- bow on and off the mat, bow to any black belt, etc.



The title thing isn't so big with him though. Clark Gracie referred to Marcelo as "Master" when they did a seminar together a couple years ago. But mostly everyone calls him Marcelo.



I like his approach but different strokes

I've never been in BJJ circles that use it, but the karate school where I grew up used it plenty. It makes me laugh when anti-TMA BJJ-types use it, for that reason.

We have (had?) an older black belt who moved up here from Brazil. I have no idea what his first name was, because all his students referred to him as "Sensei" Salustiano.  I hear he was very nice, and very knowledgeable.  They liked that he used the title because they were fond of him and very respectful.