When Atheists go to court....

...do they have to swear on the bible? Phone Post 3.0

nope, just at it

I don't think they use a bible anymore.

I don't think they swear on the bible anymore

When the say, "do you promise to tell the truth the whole truth and nothing but the truth" what would happen if you said "No"? Phone Post 3.0

you are admitting to perjury and would go to jail

ILoveWatchingJonesBoneShogun - you are admitting to perjury and would go to jail


Perjury hasn't occured yet because you haven't testified. 



I would think that if you weren't compelled to court then the judge would just dismiss you but if you were you would probably be ordered to affirm or be held in contempt of court. I could be wrong though that's just my best guess. 

Jacques Furiously - When the say, "do you promise to tell the truth the whole truth and nothing but the truth" what would happen if you said "No"? Phone Post 3.0

Probably held in contempt.

If swearing on the Bible is considered an ironclad promise before God and the court, why wouldn't testifying that God instructed you to do what you did be a reasonable defense?

ptper - If swearing on the Bible is considered an ironclad promise before God and the court, why wouldn't testifying that God instructed you to do what you did be a reasonable defense?

Because 99.9 percent just associate the wording with tradition and nothing more. Also, the average juror would never imagine a god to instruct someone to commit an evil act because they probably have a very limited understanding of religion that is more less restriced to something like the 10 commandments. Anything is a reasonable defense if a juror thinks it is

Sagiv Lapkin -


I don't think they use a bible anymore.

Still do in certain courts in WV. Phone Post 3.0

You can refuse to swear "to god' and piss of the christian republican elected judge, but I'd never let my clients do that.  You raise your right hand, you don't put your hand on a bible.  I've never seen someone refuse the oath, but they could be held in contempt for refusing to testify truthfully and refusing the oath would be seen the same way.  Honestly, the oath is not necessary.  If you speak in a courtroom you are subject to perjury charges whether you take the oath, believe in god, or not.  I think the oath is just a formality to stress the seriousness of the proceedings to the witness and jury.  

thirdleg - 
ptper - If swearing on the Bible is considered an ironclad promise before God and the court, why wouldn't testifying that God instructed you to do what you did be a reasonable defense?

Is it not a reasonable defense?

Should be.

Claiming that God instructed you to do what you did?

Cause it's retarded, I suppose.

Is there a single instance of someone not being convicted because they convinced a judge or jury that it was God's will?

I've found a few articles about the accused making the claim, but ultimately they were either deemed insane or convicted.