Where to invest $25k?

kyle223 - 
cdmontgo - A target date fund is intended to be a set it and forget it solution. You pick the one that has the asset allocation and glide path that you want and put everything you have into that. They handle rebalancing and shift your asset allocation for you. The assets are typically whole market mutual funds which gives you plenty of diversity within that asset class.

What is in your TD fund? What's the AA? What's the glide path? What are the fees?

How does buying the S&P improve that?
Target retirement fund is through Fidelity. T. Rowe price 2045. I'm only 28 so I don't anticipate retiring for at least another 30 years.

I looked online today for pros and cons of a target retirement fund. The one I initially had has pretty high management fees, at least according to online reviews, at .75%. I read a lot about the benefits of investing in index funds, so I found one called Spartan 500 index fund with high returns over the last 10 years and moderate risk. Also, very low fees.

Would I be an idiot to put 100% in the s&p index fund? I called and spoke to a representative at Fidelity but the woman wasn't very helpful. Phone Post 3.0

If your plan is through Fido, I assume there are other TD funds offered through them rather than TRP. What are the expenses on Fido's 2045?

According to M*, your TRP TD fund holds:

Cash 3.36%
US Stocks 57.47%
Non US Stocks 29.06%
Bonds 9.27%
Other 0.84%

Which means the AA provided by that fund is about 90% stocks / 10% bonds. That's pretty typical of TD funds that are more than 30 years from their target date. The glide path typically begins at 30 years out, though each company is a bit different, and I'm not familar w/ TRP.

Is 90/10 what you want? Is there another TD fund that is cheaper and provides the AA you want?

Since you are also buying the S&P, you are increasing the stock portion of your AA. You didn't say how much you hold in each fund, so I can only tell you your AA is greater than 90/10. If you put it all in the S&P, your AA would be 100/0 which implies no rebalancing. Rebalancing is benificial, but that is a long post on its own, and there is plenty of info on that online.

You could post the investment options in your account along with their expenses if you want more specific feedback.

Another option for the old pension is to open an IRA with Vanguard and buy their 2045 TD fund at a 0.18% expense ratio.

If you max out your 401k space each year, you might not want to have an traditional IRA though. Do you max your 401k? Do you think you might do so soon?

cdmontgo - Another option for the old pension is to open an IRA with Vanguard and buy their 2045 TD fund at a 0.18% expense ratio.

If you max out your 401k space each year, you might not want to have an traditional IRA though. Do you max your 401k? Do you think you might do so soon?
Awesome. Really appreciate the info. I will look more into everything tomorrow. VU! Phone Post 3.0

cdmontgo - Another option for the old pension is to open an IRA with Vanguard and buy their 2045 TD fund at a 0.18% expense ratio.

If you max out your 401k space each year, you might not want to have an traditional IRA though. Do you max your 401k? Do you think you might do so soon?
And no, I don't max my Roth IRA right now. I wish. Phone Post 3.0

VTSAX.

kyle223 - 
cdmontgo - Another option for the old pension is to open an IRA with Vanguard and buy their 2045 TD fund at a 0.18% expense ratio.

If you max out your 401k space each year, you might not want to have an traditional IRA though. Do you max your 401k? Do you think you might do so soon?
And no, I don't max my Roth IRA right now. I wish. Phone Post 3.0

I was asking about your 401k rather than Roth IRA, and having a Roth IRA is why I asked.

There are laws that attempt to keep higher income people from contributing directing to a Roth IRA. Specifically, there is an IRA phaseout. If you contribute to a workplace retirement plan (aka 401k), you may not be eligible to contribute directly to a Roth IRA depending on your MAGI. Some people go around this by doing something that is loosely called a Backdoor Roth. Having assets in a traditional IRA kind of screw up this approach though. If you think you will end up going the Backdoor Roth route, putting the pension into a tIRA is a less attractive approach. If not, a tIRA is a no brainer if the options in the 401k aren't so great.

WorlynnLotD - 
Dr Gonzo - Scratch-offs.
Was this not the correct answer.? Phone Post 3.0

Because scrath-offs < coke & whores in vegas.

Seems obvious.