Why MMA for the street....

I wrote this guys after spending WAY too many hours trying to explain to people why MMA is effective base for self defense and why TMA are not the only answer for self defense. (I stole some quotes from a few people)

 

FAQ 1:

Why can I not begin in the self defence class after all I am here to learn to defend myself not play sport?

 

The answer is both simple and complex. The simple answer is that self defence itself is very much misunderstood. People generally look for a quick answer to their self protection needs and there is a quick answer but most people don't like to hear it.

 

It is two fold:

1)      There is no way someone can quickly (in under a few lessons) learn to defend themselves effectively in the variety of situations that will present themselves.

2)      There is no way someone can effectively predict all of the situations in which they will have to defend themselves and even so their prediction will not prepare them for it.

 

So if someone cannot predict where or how they will be attacked how can one prepare for self-defence? Luckily the answer is very simple and largely overlooked.

The answer is to not prepare for the situation but rather prepare the effective delivery systems, which can be readily, effectively and easily ADAPTED to the situation.

 

Take this exercise:

1)      List every which way in which u think you could be attacked.

2)      Take these scenarios and identify the weapons or body parts and methods used to attack you.

3)      Put them into groups and tally the common ones.

 

If you did this exercise truthfully you will realise that despite the numerous number of situations, there are limited ways in which to assault someone utilising the human body and extensions of it (knives, sticks, bats, bottles etc).

 

 

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These are :<?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" />/o:p


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Arms (Punching/Slapping, elbowing, gouging, stabbing/slashing/swinging)/o:p


Legs (Kicking, Kneeing, stomping)/o:p


Wrestling (Choking, grabbing, tackling, headlocking etc)/o:p


Head (Headbutting)/o:p


Mouth (Biting, shouting/swearing)/o:p


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Regardless of the situation, they will always fit into these categories and consist of combinations of the above./o:p


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A common scenario in an assault is a verbal exchange, a punch is thrown (based on statistics most commonly a right hand), grabbing/grappling occurs which may include punches, head butts, knees or kicks and the fight hits the ground. If someone isn't trained in BJJ, they will often give up advantages position and be pummelled unconscious. /o:p


 


 


Now say I prepare for that situation by mapping it out and blocking his right punch and countering with a technique of my own, then he grabs me and I apply one of thousands of available techniques to disable him and finish him there. I train this slowly without any resistance, executed perfectly every single time. I do 1000 repetitions and feel safe on my way home or out at night, because I can handle this situation. Next lesson and the one after I will cover the next two possible scenarios, such as he puts his hand on my collar and tries to hit me with a right cross. /o:p


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Sounds good?<?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" />/o:p


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OK, so what happens if your right hand block doesn't work?/o:p


Can you tell its going to be an overhand, uppercut, hook, straight right or elbow?/o:p


What happens if he throws a left hand instead?/o:p


What happens if he starts with a footy tackle or a headlock (very common)/o:p


What happens if he throws more than one punch?/o:p


What if the punch lands?/o:p


What if your lock/hold doesn't work and the assailants adrenaline response allows the pain applied from the hold to be nullified and it becomes ineffective?/o:p


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What now?/o:p


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This is a common practice in 95% of martial arts schools and styles. The "What ifs" are ignored in light of tradition and the delivery systems are ignored for the answers to every question dished out by the Sifu/Sensei/Dictator of the Dojo/Dojang/Training hall. It /o:p


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Do you see any problems with this training method?
Then why is it so popular? Again the answer is two fold:/o:p


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1)      It keeps gyms in business and keeps people wanting the deadly secret techniques and the answers for every scenario. Supply (Bandaids) and Demand (Fear)/o:p


2)      Its easy, the instructor can learn it quickly and start charging, can never be questioned by his students doubts and it avoids the real combat truth: Proficiency takes hard WORK/o:p


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So basically you cannot prepare for every situation, you cannot expect your performance to perfectly reflect what you learn in the gym and to assume you can is fatal./o:p


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By now you are probably feeling a little panicky (possibly annoyed that a seemingly simple question has become so convoluted) and wondering what the solution is.  It is actually very very simple, fun and easy to learn. <?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" />/o:p


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The answer is delivery systems. /o:p


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Delivery systems are Striking, Clinch, Ground. In each range we have whole sports based around efficient performance in these ranges, constantly in evolution with decades, even centuries and millions of dollars developing them. The important point here is that the delivery systems have come about as each range/sport consists of two athletes competing against each other with 100% resistance and under pressure./o:p


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These are: /o:p


Standing : Boxing, Muay Thai, Savate, Kickboxing/o:p


Clinch: Judo, Wrestling, Muay Thai./o:p


Ground: Bjj, Sambo, Judo, Wrestling, Shooto./o:p


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What has come about from these sports is (and MMA which will be discussed briefly) the realisation that not all arts are equal and specific strategies (particularly positional) are superior. Performance is the focus, not mysticism or rote learning. The name of the style itself is unimportant, but we will use BJJ as an example. Delivery systems can be adapted to the appropriate situation, but not vice versa./o:p


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If one where a white belt SKILL LEVEL in BJJ, and then believe you are ready to start creating your own delivery system on the ground would be silly, and a lesson in futility. One would need to learn guard, mount, cross sides, headlock escapes, etc. Why re invent the wheel? There are experts in these delivery systems and proven training methods for rapid improvement and establishment of your abilities in this range./o:p


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EVERY athlete will indeed develop his or her own "Style" as they acquire skill in the delivery systems of stand up, clinch, and ground, through ALIVE training, and testing themselves against thousands of training partners and opponents over time.  /o:p


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An easy way of understanding delivery systems is to look at the example of an armbar. There are different variations of it and it is present in judo, bjj, sambo and even non athletic arts like Kali, Aikido and karate. However the truth remains that there is a "best" way to apply an armbar and in order for a smaller person to overcome a larger one, these aspects of technique, timing and resistance need to be applied. However an armbar is just an armbar. In order to apply this armbar, unless the person is a corpse, you will need a method or strategy in order to get them into the position in which you can apply it.....WHILE THEY ARE RESISTING. In other words you need a strategy system which can be applied even when your opponent is resisting. These are your delivery systems. The human body can only move in so many ways, the delivery system in BJJ, Boxing, Wrestling are designed around this. /o:p


Taking your knowledge now of the three ranges and their delivery systems one must realize that learning one is not adequate. We cannot train these separately otherwise the transitions between the systems will be not only noticeable but a fatal flaw in your overall combat abilities. For example, if you trained the subsidiaries of MMA separately (Boxing, BJJ, Muay Thai, Wrestling) when it comes to a situation such as self defence it will be hard to adapt and flow in and out of the different ranges. For example if you train boxing and wrestling separately, you will have effective offence and defence against punches but when somebody shoots on you (goes for a footy tackle) very often the change from boxing to wrestling is too slow. Thus it is important to train the delivery systems in an integrated manner so that Striking flows to Clinch and Clinch to Ground and vice versa. It is a simple concept but very rarely is it seen in practice except at successful MMA gyms./o:p


The grappling arts imply: "most fights end up on the ground...take them there "The striking arts imply: "all fights start standing up...keep them there "The mixed martial arts imply: "any fight can go anywhere...be ready and able to go everywhere" /o:p


Once we are proficient in these delivery systems, the athlete is ready to focus on self defence. /o:p


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The following formula is hard to argue with:/o:p


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Delivery Systems (MMA) + Off road + Adrenal/Verbal prep. = Effective Self Defence/o:p


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What we refer to as Offroad is adding "illegal" techniques (such as gouging, groin striking, caveman shots, biting etc) to your arsenal and adapting your delivery systems in an alive atmosphere (with resistance) with methods that are illegal in normal sport (for example biting, eye gouging, weapons etc). /o:p


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A constant response by people looking for a quick fix is that they will "poke someone's eyes out" or "bite someone's throat out". It is not that these techniques wont hurt somebody, they will, but the problem is getting oneself in a position to apply these techniques. Secondly it is impossible to practice these techniques realistically and gauge how they will affect the assailant. Take the following as an example:/o:p


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Paul Sharp (Police Officer, SWAT Team Trainer and MMA coach)/o:p


"Just to add on to James point. This past weekend I arrested one half of a domestic battery. As I am taking him into the booking area to turn him over to the jailers he doubles over, falls to his knees and starts bellowing and puking. I asked him what his problem is and he says his stomach hurts. The jailer calls for a rescue and he is taken to the emergency room. The doc asks what happened, I tell him I have no idea, he was choking the life out of his brother when I showed up, all I did was spray him. Doc checks his stomach, looks around and than says his testicles have ascended..., Later his cousin said that during the fight he had hit him in the nads approximately 30-40 times as hard as he could while he was choking him. Didn't stop him from choking him unconscious./o:p


Another one happened about a year ago, I'm walking up to a father/son domestic when the son steps out onto the porch where dad is sitting on the stoop and hits dad full tilt with a golf club dead on in the throat. Dad does a weird squeal and jumps up, pulls knife and goes after the kid./o:p


What was that acronym about throat-eyes-solar plexus-nads-knees? Somebody should have told those guy's when you get hit in a pressure point you go down no questions asked..."/o:p


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At the end of the day the basic truth remains /o:p


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1)      There are only three ranges in any fight : Standup, Clinch and Ground. They are not separate and combat moves freely from one to the other./o:p


2)      One can only attack with the given limbs : Arms, Legs, Head. /o:p


3)      No amount of discussing the negative outcomes of grappling when outnumbered will stop the grappling and clinch range occurring in a real combat situation (sport or street)/o:p


4)      Someone effective in combat will closely resemble an MMA athlete . Someone non effective wont. /o:p


5)      Delivery systems are high percentage and can be adapted to any given situation but not vice versa. The situation dictates the approach but doesn't change the basic delivery system. /o:p


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Training for combat/self defense can be looked at in another way:/o:p


Train swimming in the water. Dry land swimming is useless. And yes, training for synchronized swimming is super hard, will allow you to navigate in water and be graceful as a fish in a bowl but it won't win a sprint or endurance race or even keep you in one. If God forbid you have a boating accident, it will increase your chances of survival but not as much as the guy who swims daily in the ocean for speed and endurance, in stillness and in motion. Sport may call for more training in endurance and "street" for more of sprinting but it's all there in you building the attributes, delivery systems, and tactics athletically for the short run and hopefully for the long haul/o:p


The bottom line is that if what you do works. .. it will naturally resemble NHB sport. If what you are doing doesn't resemble some aspect of NHB then it's without a doubt not athletic, and as a consequence, not functional./o:p


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At the VT-1 Gym, we have based our training, methods, and curriculum on what has shown to work best under the pressure of an aggressive resisting attacker in a specific field of operations. Be it self defense scenarios', MMA fights, Law Enforcement training, etc./o:p


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This is why we do not train "self defense" first but rather effective performance of the delivery systems are required first./o:p


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The warrior bows down before no man, and allows no man to bow down before him.


 


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Ok so thats it. Long, but i think its well laid out. Interested in your guys responses and arguments./o:p/o:p

i didnt make it through... but ttt

LOL
i didnt realise how long it was, but its a good read.

Especially for those who are instructors or sick of telling people why MMA is good for self defense.

awesome post

Mondo, mega FRAT

Need pictures to make it interesting?

very similar to mastering Ju-jitsu, so I think its great.

FRAT squared!!

i made it about halfway through that time. but ill ttt your effort

 

Alot of you guys already know this. But its good way to structure your discussion with TMA people or naive's.

That's a lot of reading......

*takes laptop to bathroom*

First of all... MMA IS NOT a style......

Its a sport!

but if your saying that Wrestling, Kickbox, BJJ etc is good for self defense then yes, i agree