WTF is wrong with Kali Culture and Conditioning?

It may just be the people I've been exposed to or know about, but why is it that many kali masters are grossly out of shape? From Chris Sayoc to Tom Kier, what is it about these Kali guys that makes them pretty much morbidly obese? Is it the filipino diet? Bad genetics?

I recently received the new Masters magazine, and was looking forward to the included DVD with Master Christopher Rickets of the Illustrisimo lineage. He had a cool interview, but low and behold, even he had a distended stomach.

Is basic conditioning not part of the kali curriculum?

Adobo and rice bro'.

Thank God I'm a kettlebeller, lol!

Well, "Masters" in most arts are kind of pudgy. The late Carlson Sr., Francisco Mansur, Jacare Cavalcanti, Mauricao Gomes, etc. Even Rigan Machado is known to put on the pounds at times. It's just age, I think. ^_^

the filipino diet does breed major health concerns(hypertension, diabetes,etc.), but i think when you're taba it's just because you REALLY like to eat.

Francisco

"Jacare Cavalcanti"

??????

Ive never seen him out of shape.

I agree with Andreh RE: Jacare! Francisco Mansur too - just saw him 6 months ago in NY

Jacare just stopped by Marcelo's gym to say hi a couple of weeks ago and he looked in great shape, as always.

Yeah, not sure where the Jacare example came from. I've seen him around town and at different events for the last 10 years and he's never looked out of shape.

Regarding Kali conditioning.....what do you need conditioning for when the blade is at your throat before you even take a breath? LOL!

You don't see any of that in Kenpo.

I don't like out of shape instructors from ANY art. Against my code as a martial artist.

I didn't say "fat" instructors. :)

At the CK-FMS workshop, one of the RKC's was also a longtime judo/sambo competitor who was also the medical consultant for USA Judo.

He didn't have ripped abs...but when he was showing me a judo pick-up, he literally picked me up like I was nothing. And I'm 194lbs., and he was about 170lbs.

 I'm with 4Ranges on both his second and third posts.



And, "in shape" is a very broad concept; it may mean many different things to many different people. For me, at least, it includes many, many more factors and attributes than simply being "strong as an ox."



John

^^^I'm with John on this one also. There are people that I know who are far weaker than me, but they are terrors on the mats and in the ring. They know how to neutralize my strength.

Mobility, timing, stamina, mental clarity, TECHNIQUE...so many many more things go into being "in shape" in the martial arts.

There's no need to be in shape when the average fight only lasts 3-5 seconds, the blade does the work, what're the odds of you being assaulted by a well-conditioned athlete, I was THERE in the SHIT, man, and I survived and I didn't need to be in shape like fairy pumping iron in the gym because I had HEART, blah, blah, blah.

^^^Hate to say it, but there are BJJ athletes who don't believe in S&C either. All they need is their "technique."

 Without plugging CrossFit itself (some don't like it; I think it stands on its own), I think many of the concepts and definitions included in this issue of their journal are very helpful, particularly the ten general phyical skills and the theoritcal hierarchy of development.



http://www.crossfit.com/cf-download/CFJ-trial.pdf



John

This is where the "MMA" myth comes into play.

Not everyone is training for an MMA fight.

If you are fighting MMA, It's not the early 90s anymore, BJJ technique alone isn't enough. Conditioning is a priority.

But, 95% of people who do martial arts are not preparing for a MMA fight.

For the most part, the actual practice of your martial art is enough conditioning to for the average Joe.

Yet, there is "life" to be concern with.

Many martial artist do not do enough basic cardio exercises to prevent heart disease, nor the basic mobility exercises and stretching to allow them to live and practice without pain. Not to mention, diet.

Martial arts is a small % of "life". Most conditioning should be done just to be a healthy and pain-free participant in "life".

nowaydo - Many martial artist do not do enough basic cardio exercises to prevent heart disease, nor the basic mobility exercises and stretching to allow them to live and practice without pain. Not to mention, diet.

Martial arts is a small % of "life". Most conditioning should be done just to be a healthy and pain-free participant in "life".


There is much truth to this.

Interestlingly, I read something once by an Aikidoka who laid out the statistics of "being attacked" vs "injuring yourself by falling". As you might imagine, the odds of seriously hurting yourself by a fall around the house is astronomically higher (for most people). It DOES make you think about how much ukemi you practice... :)

Since we're on the subject:

- What kind of S&C do you guys do outside of your martial arts training?

- How much time do you put into your S&C training?

Right now, my own martial arts practice is spread out 7 days a week, but not for long stretches. 30 minutes at the most for technique training.

My S&C is about 5 days a week, an hour a day.

40% Joint Mobility

20% Static Stretching

20% core conditioning

20% Cardio

Sometimes I combine the categories.