Your Academy Teach Actual Self Defense Portion?

After watching the video posted on Chuck Norris bringing the Gracies for a seminar, I realized that a lot of those techniques for self defense don't really get taught, because the sport has evolved away from self defense and more for getting tournament ready.

For example, the way you would approach say, being on the bottom side control is the complete opposite in a fight than in the sport. In a tournament, you tuck your elbows and try to create space to escape or recover guard. In a fight, you need to close the distance or you'll eat shots to the face. This is an aspect that is often overlooked when teaching the original essence of these techniques!

Also, does your academy teach certain self defense scenarios like in the original curriculum? Stuff like standing headlock defenses, front and rear bear hug escapes, standing mata leao escapes, what to do if the attacker is trying to pick you up from behind and throw you, and standing guillotine defenses. I've realized that in my academy, only about half of these are covered and no mention of the different approach to the jiu jitsu from compromising positions in a real fight (bottom side control, bottom mount, bottom half guard)

rexkwondo79 - Also, does your academy teach certain self defense scenarios like in the original curriculum? Stuff like standing headlock defenses, front and rear bear hug escapes, standing mata leao escapes, what to do if the attacker is trying to pick you up from behind and throw you, and standing guillotine defenses. I've realized that in my academy, only about half of these are covered and no mention of the different approach to the jiu jitsu from compromising positions in a real fight (bottom side control, bottom mount, bottom half guard)


 We do the standing self defense stuff as part of our warm up every class, the same stuff as shown in the Chuck Norris video.  I train at Chattanooga Jiu-jitsu academy. 

 we do yes

my roots are in Gracie Torrence so its a part of my program

Yup, Its part of our fundamentals cirricumlum.

Yes, because I'm at a Gracie Barra school: there is a self defence portion during every fundamentals class.

I'm not sure how useful those kind of drills are for self defence, because bear hug escapes etc tend to only ever be drilled compliantly, rather than against full resistance.

We review one self defense technique at the beginning of just about every class. Phone Post

I barely teach any self-defense. Pretty much only during intro seminars. If you train sport jiu-jitsu you'll learn to defend yourself pretty well. We also have wresting, judo, boxing and muay thai classes. If I person can't defend himself after learning all that, a standing wrist lock isn't going to do much for him.

matt murdock - I barely teach any self-defense. Pretty much only during intro seminars. If you train sport jiu-jitsu you'll learn to defend yourself pretty well. We also have wresting, judo, boxing and muay thai classes. If I person can't defend himself after learning all that, a standing wrist lock isn't going to do much for him.


 ^This is how its done at my school.

rexkwondo79 - For example, the way you would approach say, being on the bottom side control is the complete opposite in a fight than in the sport. In a tournament, you tuck your elbows and try to create space to escape or recover guard. In a fight, you need to close the distance or you'll eat shots to the face. This is an aspect that is often overlooked when teaching the original essence of these techniques!


Disagree. IMO, the way you approach bottom side or any other position should not change between a fight and a comp. Hug a guy while bottom side all you've done is held yourself in bottom side. If you move effectively the guy on top will have a hard time hitting you and if he does it will most likely give you the opportunity to improve your position.
 


Disagree. IMO, the way you approach bottom side or any other position should not change between a fight and a comp. Hug a guy while bottom side all you've done is held yourself in bottom side. If you move effectively the guy on top will have a hard time hitting you and if he does it will most likely give you the opportunity to improve your position.
 

The problem with this strategy is the guy on top has the advantage to disengage and hit you at will. The guy on bottom doesn't just hold on but manages the top guys ability to create space. When you feel the top guy trying to create space then you use that moment to escape. If you don't' control the distance you will take a pounding while you look for the opportunity to escape. The big difference is the bottom guys has a real sense of managing how distance is created vs when you roll for fun and just create space without worrying if your open to elbow, headbutts, etc.

bgup619 - Yup, Its part of our fundamentals cirricumlum.
This. Phone Post

We teach self defense to little kids, women, and "fancy men".



We actually teach what we call the "Street Berimbolo Series" in order to make sure our students will be safe in any street encounter.

But I am a realist too...

I know that if I am in a "REAL" situation on the street there is an approximate 50% chance my assailant will be armed with a Kubotan Pocket Stick.

So, avoidance is crucial.



At Rilion Gracie's academy in Miami, he teaches self defense stuff in every fundamental class.

Yes and much more.......

shen - 

We actually teach what we call the "Street Berimbolo Series" in order to make sure our students will be safe in any street encounter.

But I am a realist too...

I know that if I am in a "REAL" situation on the street there is an approximate 50% chance my assailant will be armed with a Kubotan Pocket Stick.

So, avoidance is crucial.





lol @ Street Berimbolo ... fucking awesome!