Muay Thai question

In BJJ they say a blue belt is around the time where you should beable to handle yourself against mostly all untrained people around your size. 
 

How much time is that in terms of Muay Thai? Where you should feel pretty comfortable against an untrained person?  

Probably about 1-2 years for both BJJ and Muay Thai, to see a notable incease in your ability to deal with violence under pressure. Boxing maybe a little quicker. A lot of it depends on an athletic background.

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Depends on a lot of factors. 

 

I've seen guys that have trained for years that are still so inept that the training hinders them with a false sense of security and reality.  They're still so afraid of hitting the heavy bag that they self-identify as prey in any sort of combat later on in the gym.  Good for them for having a passion and staying fit.  But the answer for them is "never".

 

I've also seen natural born killers who just randomly show up and start doing two-a-days 5 or 6 days a week.  Super fit, super aggressive, super fast learners.  One month.

 

But both types are rare.

 

I'm not sure the once-or-twice per week crowd ever really get there.  Anyone who goes after it, though... they're good enough to get themselves into trouble at 3 months, good enough to get themselves out of trouble at 6 months.

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Bend The Knee -

In BJJ they say a blue belt is around the time where you should beable to handle yourself against mostly all untrained people around your size. 
 


How much time is that in terms of Muay Thai? Where you should feel pretty comfortable against an untrained person?  

"against an untrained person"


 


In BJJ an untrained person is not going to submit you no matter how hard they try.  But an untrained highly motivated person can still knock you the fuck out.  It's a really weird comparison.


 


The question seems to entertain the idea of combat against a random.  The faster that fades away with experience, the better.

jgiveshead -
Bend The Knee -

In BJJ they say a blue belt is around the time where you should beable to handle yourself against mostly all untrained people around your size. 
 


How much time is that in terms of Muay Thai? Where you should feel pretty comfortable against an untrained person?  

"against an untrained person"


 


In BJJ an untrained person is not going to submit you no matter how hard they try.  But an untrained highly motivated person can still knock you the fuck out.  It's a really weird comparison.


 


The question seems to entertain the idea of combat against a random.  The faster that fades away with experience, the better.

"It's a really weird comparison"


 


I don't think its really weird to try to ask when the average person will be able to handle themselves in a self defense situation if needed.  

jgiveshead -
Bend The Knee -

In BJJ they say a blue belt is around the time where you should beable to handle yourself against mostly all untrained people around your size. 
 


How much time is that in terms of Muay Thai? Where you should feel pretty comfortable against an untrained person?  

"against an untrained person"


 


In BJJ an untrained person is not going to submit you no matter how hard they try.  But an untrained highly motivated person can still knock you the fuck out.  It's a really weird comparison.


 


The question seems to entertain the idea of combat against a random.  The faster that fades away with experience, the better.

Ask bj penn

jgiveshead - 
Bend The Knee -

In BJJ they say a blue belt is around the time where you should beable to handle yourself against mostly all untrained people around your size. 
 

How much time is that in terms of Muay Thai? Where you should feel pretty comfortable against an untrained person?  

"against an untrained person"

 

In BJJ an untrained person is not going to submit you no matter how hard they try.  But an untrained highly motivated person can still knock you the fuck out.  It's a really weird comparison.

 

The question seems to entertain the idea of combat against a random.  The faster that fades away with experience, the better.




Thankfully, bjj guys train how to deal with unskilled wild aggression, including clinching against strikes, and throws and takedowns, as well as how to deal with elbows, knees, punches and head butts on the ground every week

Kirik -

Probably about 1-2 years for both BJJ and Muay Thai, to see a notable incease in your ability to deal with violence under pressure. Boxing maybe a little quicker. A lot of it depends on an athletic background.

lol @ the concept of unleashing trained boxers

FatBuddha -
jgiveshead - 
Bend The Knee -

In BJJ they say a blue belt is around the time where you should beable to handle yourself against mostly all untrained people around your size. 
 

How much time is that in terms of Muay Thai? Where you should feel pretty comfortable against an untrained person?  

"against an untrained person"

 

In BJJ an untrained person is not going to submit you no matter how hard they try.  But an untrained highly motivated person can still knock you the fuck out.  It's a really weird comparison.

 

The question seems to entertain the idea of combat against a random.  The faster that fades away with experience, the better.


Thankfully, bjj guys train how to deal with unskilled wild aggression, including clinching against strikes, and throws and takedowns, as well as how to deal with elbows, knees, punches and head butts on the ground every week

Yeah, pretty happy also

How often you spar and how intense the sparring is plays a giant factor 

WHEN YOU SPAR ON THE REGULAR.....GOT TO ACTAULLY COMPETE TO BE SOLID AT ANYTHING

IamHe -

WHEN YOU SPAR ON THE REGULAR.....GOT TO ACTAULLY COMPETE TO BE SOLID AT ANYTHING

WHAT?

The Sauce -

How often you spar and how intense the sparring is plays a giant factor 

Yeah I guess that makes sense. I assume that when you're training a striking art with someone who is experienced they're throwing things the "right way", where against someone with no experience they can be more unorthodox or throw things "wrong" that will actually sometimes work...if you aren't expecting that. 
 


I just more or so meant it as an in general situation. Of course there are always exceptions to every rule

Kirik -

Probably about 1-2 years for both BJJ and Muay Thai, to see a notable incease in your ability to deal with violence under pressure. Boxing maybe a little quicker. A lot of it depends on an athletic background.

 


There are a couple of differences in the effectiveness of a two year jiu-jitsu student and a two year muay thai fighter imo. If the untrained person is very athletic then they can instinctively use their striking ability to KO a Muay Thai fighter trying to trade with them but a jiu-jitsu fighter avoids that range and closes the distance and it is less likely that an untrained fighter, even if he is athletic will have instincts to overcome a jiu-jitsu fighter. Also if you compare a two year muay thau fighter with a two year jiu-jitsu fighter then the jiu-jitsu guy wins a big majority of the time.

Calhoon -
Kirik -

Probably about 1-2 years for both BJJ and Muay Thai, to see a notable incease in your ability to deal with violence under pressure. Boxing maybe a little quicker. A lot of it depends on an athletic background.

 

There are a couple of differences in the effectiveness of a two year jiu-jitsu student and a two year muay thai fighter imo. If the untrained person is very athletic then they can instinctively use their striking ability to KO a Muay Thai fighter trying to trade with them but a jiu-jitsu fighter avoids that range and closes the distance and it is less likely that an untrained fighter, even if he is athletic will have instincts to overcome a jiu-jitsu fighter. Also if you compare a two year muay thau fighter with a two year jiu-jitsu fighter then the jiu-jitsu guy wins a big majority of the time.


I mean of course I know "anyone" can land a KO punch, but that same person isn't going to submit you. 
 


But Im asking as more of an "in general" term. Situations where you can't/shouldn't go to the ground etc. And are forced to use striking. 
 


Also MOST bjj guys have shit takedowns, but thats a whole different conversation. 

Bend The Knee -
Calhoon -
Kirik -

Probably about 1-2 years for both BJJ and Muay Thai, to see a notable incease in your ability to deal with violence under pressure. Boxing maybe a little quicker. A lot of it depends on an athletic background.

 

There are a couple of differences in the effectiveness of a two year jiu-jitsu student and a two year muay thai fighter imo. If the untrained person is very athletic then they can instinctively use their striking ability to KO a Muay Thai fighter trying to trade with them but a jiu-jitsu fighter avoids that range and closes the distance and it is less likely that an untrained fighter, even if he is athletic will have instincts to overcome a jiu-jitsu fighter. Also if you compare a two year muay thau fighter with a two year jiu-jitsu fighter then the jiu-jitsu guy wins a big majority of the time.


I mean of course I know "anyone" can land a KO punch, but that same person isn't going to submit you. 
 


But Im asking as more of an "in general" term. Situations where you can't/shouldn't go to the ground etc. And are forced to use striking. 
 


Also MOST bjj guys have shit takedowns, but thats a whole different conversation. 



Imo if you go to a good school that teaches self defense then closing the distance, clinching, and taking down, even an athletic person, should be something you are relatively confident in doing with two years of training. 

Bend The Knee -
Calhoon -
Kirik -

Probably about 1-2 years for both BJJ and Muay Thai, to see a notable incease in your ability to deal with violence under pressure. Boxing maybe a little quicker. A lot of it depends on an athletic background.

 

There are a couple of differences in the effectiveness of a two year jiu-jitsu student and a two year muay thai fighter imo. If the untrained person is very athletic then they can instinctively use their striking ability to KO a Muay Thai fighter trying to trade with them but a jiu-jitsu fighter avoids that range and closes the distance and it is less likely that an untrained fighter, even if he is athletic will have instincts to overcome a jiu-jitsu fighter. Also if you compare a two year muay thau fighter with a two year jiu-jitsu fighter then the jiu-jitsu guy wins a big majority of the time.


I mean of course I know "anyone" can land a KO punch, but that same person isn't going to submit you. 
 


But Im asking as more of an "in general" term. Situations where you can't/shouldn't go to the ground etc. And are forced to use striking. 
 


Also MOST bjj guys have shit takedowns, but thats a whole different conversation. 



Two years sounds about right. 


 


On a side note. If I were to recommend a fight strategy to a two year muay thai student who was defending against a more athletic attacker and they did not want to go to the ground, I would not recommend for them to trade with the attacker. I would still recommend a clinch game, only with the thai plum, and they can offbalance and use their knees and elbows from there. If there are multiple attackers they can use their clinch to stear the attacker in between theirself and a second attacker. It's not likely a two year student is going to beat multiple attackers that are really looking to attack but that offers the best chances imo.

Calhoon -
Bend The Knee -
Calhoon -
Kirik -

Probably about 1-2 years for both BJJ and Muay Thai, to see a notable incease in your ability to deal with violence under pressure. Boxing maybe a little quicker. A lot of it depends on an athletic background.

 

There are a couple of differences in the effectiveness of a two year jiu-jitsu student and a two year muay thai fighter imo. If the untrained person is very athletic then they can instinctively use their striking ability to KO a Muay Thai fighter trying to trade with them but a jiu-jitsu fighter avoids that range and closes the distance and it is less likely that an untrained fighter, even if he is athletic will have instincts to overcome a jiu-jitsu fighter. Also if you compare a two year muay thau fighter with a two year jiu-jitsu fighter then the jiu-jitsu guy wins a big majority of the time.


I mean of course I know "anyone" can land a KO punch, but that same person isn't going to submit you. 
 


But Im asking as more of an "in general" term. Situations where you can't/shouldn't go to the ground etc. And are forced to use striking. 
 


Also MOST bjj guys have shit takedowns, but thats a whole different conversation. 



Imo if you go to a good school that teaches self defense then closing the distance, clinching, and taking down, even an athletic person, should be something you are relatively confident in doing with two years of training. 

Bjj wise you mean? 

Calhoon -
Bend The Knee -
Calhoon -
Kirik -

Probably about 1-2 years for both BJJ and Muay Thai, to see a notable incease in your ability to deal with violence under pressure. Boxing maybe a little quicker. A lot of it depends on an athletic background.

 

There are a couple of differences in the effectiveness of a two year jiu-jitsu student and a two year muay thai fighter imo. If the untrained person is very athletic then they can instinctively use their striking ability to KO a Muay Thai fighter trying to trade with them but a jiu-jitsu fighter avoids that range and closes the distance and it is less likely that an untrained fighter, even if he is athletic will have instincts to overcome a jiu-jitsu fighter. Also if you compare a two year muay thau fighter with a two year jiu-jitsu fighter then the jiu-jitsu guy wins a big majority of the time.


I mean of course I know "anyone" can land a KO punch, but that same person isn't going to submit you. 
 


But Im asking as more of an "in general" term. Situations where you can't/shouldn't go to the ground etc. And are forced to use striking. 
 


Also MOST bjj guys have shit takedowns, but thats a whole different conversation. 



Two years sounds about right. 


 


On a side note. If I were to recommend a fight strategy to a two year muay thai student who was defending against a more athletic attacker and they did not want to go to the ground, I would not recommend for them to trade with the attacker. I would still recommend a clinch game, only with the thai plum, and they can offbalance and use their knees and elbows from there. If there are multiple attackers they can use their clinch to stear the attacker in between theirself and a second attacker. It's not likely a two year student is going to beat multiple attackers that are really looking to attack but that offers the best chances imo.



I mean couldn't they also use leg kicks? I feel like if thrown correctly those things hurt pretty bad and someone untrained isn't going to know how to properly defend them.